Lake Effect

Airs Weekdays at 10 am and 10 pm (except Thursdays) & Weekends at 3 pm

Lake Effect, WUWM’s locally-produced magazine program, covers a lot of ground, focusing on your neighbors and your issues. From discussing politics and the economy to spotlighting Wisconsin authors and musicians, Lake Effect goes beyond the headlines. Join the Lake Effect team as they open a window onto life in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.

Wednesday on Lake Effect:

Contributor Dave Kozlowski discusses how farm economics work - from large-scale growers, to smaller producers. Later, a Milwaukee man publishes the remarkable travel journal his father kept on the trip of a lifetime - two months in Europe in 1936. Essayist Lauren Fox writes about her grandparents' decision to leave Europe in the 1930s, and we catch up with the Milwaukee band Dead Horses, who just released a new single.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect

Are teenagers in Wisconsin being set up for failure when it comes to managing their money? New data shows that could well be the case. Then, our Fit For You segment explores Ayurveda, a wellness system with origins in India. And the founder of Wild Space Dance Company explains the way she thinks about movement.

Guests:

  • Brenda Campbell, president and CEO, SecureFutures
  • Carol Nace, owner and operator, Bodhi Ayurveda
  • Deb Loewen, founder and artistic director, Wild Space Dance Company

Monday on Lake Effect:

Why cities around the country are starting to build streetcars. Then, a visit to the Museum of Wisconsin Art with Radio Chipstone, to explore the exhibition of children’s clothes designed by Milwaukee native Florence Eiseman. Plus, we meet the woman responsible for the museum's other exhibition: The Roddis Collection. Later, why it's important to bring children along on trips to other parts of the state, the country, or even the world.

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This weekend on Lake Effect

A look at the difficulty students face navigating sex, power, and consent on college campuses. Then, a leading concussion doctor talks about the growing awareness of concussion injuries. We meet two families in a time of transition, as teens moves from high school to college and we have the latest edition of our story-telling series Ex Fabula.

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Friday on Lake Effect

Republican and Democratic governors seek to break a legislative stalemate on healthcare reform. Later, Milwaukee Magazine shares its Fall arts preview. Renaissance Theaterworks celebrates 25 years of women making theatre with its Br!nk New Play Festival this weekend. And Bubbler Talk returns with an intoxicatingly sweet topic suggested by a listener.

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Thursday on Lake Effect

A note of caution from the man who shone a national spotlight on the drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan. Later, the benefits (and downsides) of being a political comedian in the Donald Trump era. A festival celebrates the renaissance of one Milwaukee neighborhood this Saturday, and local filmmakers explain the rush they get from making short films in Milwaukee.

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Wednesday on Lake Effect:

Tuesday on Lake Effect:

We discuss trying to navigate the difficult landscape of sex, power, and consent on college campuses. Then, novelist Tom Perrotta explores some of that same landscape, both among college students, and the parents they leave behind at home. Plus we learn about the ambitious aim of a young theatre company opening a production of “Next to Normal” this week at Next Act Theatre.

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Monday on Lake Effect

A Marquette researcher delves into the complicated science of gender and performance in sports. Then, the bizarre story of a homemade submarine and an extortion plot in 1940s Milwaukee. And how art therapists know that using art is helping their clients get through their mental health challenges.

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This weekend on Lake Effect:

We look back on a landmark in Milwaukee history - the start of 200 nights of open housing marches. Race and ethnicity reporter Aisha Turner speaks with a man who was front and center during that time - Prentice McKinney. Then we examine cybersecurity and internet connected devices, from your fitness tracker to your car. Radio Chipstone introduces us to a woman looking at the pervasive nature of racism in Wisconsin’s history, and we present the latest edition of our storytelling series, Ex Fabula.

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Friday on Lake Effect:

As teenagers they marched for housing reforms - 50 years later, they share those memories. Then, as the school year begins, we recap the week in education with reporter Rachel Morello. An architect talks about the disconnect cabin owners are seeking, and we’ll take a road trip to northern Wisconsin and a couple of summer camps that have been part of one family for decades.

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Thursday on Lake Effect:

A look at Milwaukee's hotel building boom, and the potential speed bumps ahead. Then, how society’s view of autism has evolved in the past four decades. Our Fit For You segment heads to the Milwaukee River for a lesson on rowing, and critic Dave Luhrssen shares his thoughts on the film Good Time.

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Wednesday on Lake Effect:

How the Strange Fruit festival in Milwaukee seeks to use music to address race relations. Later, a farm-to-table dinner honors some of the high school students who worked the land. A Whitefish Bay woman’s recent book tries to help parents get their kids ready to leave the nest with some basic realities. Plus musician Trapper Schoepp explains how Bay Beach Amusement Park inspired his new album.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect

A look at cybersecurity and interconnected devices, from fitness tracker to cars. Then, an update on a wide-scale effort to improve the health of people living in Dodge County. Plus, why bees need cities and cities need bees.

Guests

Monday on Lake Effect

We remember the 50th anniversary of a landmark in Milwaukee history: the start of 200 nights of open housing marches in the city. Former NAACP Youth Commando leader, Prentice McKinney, discusses his work in the fight for open housing. Then, a look back at the history of Milwaukee's black-white divide and the continued segregation of the city today. And Margaret Rozga, widow of Father James Groppi, talks about his legacy and her own work in the civil rights movement.

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