Lake Effect

Airs Weekdays at 10 am & Weekends at 3 pm

Lake Effect, WUWM’s locally-produced magazine program, covers a lot of ground, focusing on your neighbors and your issues. From discussing politics and the economy to spotlighting Wisconsin authors and musicians, Lake Effect goes beyond the headlines. Join the Lake Effect team as they open a window onto life in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.

This weekend on Lake Effect:

A conversation with author Matt Desmond who lived in several poverty stricken parts of Milwaukee for his watershed book on the eviction crisis in America.  Then, Radio Chipstone visits Madison’s Lakeside Printing Press, which has always has a lot of posters in its windows - even if their content has changed. Plus we’ll have the latest episode of our storytelling series Ex Fabula.

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Friday on Lake Effect:

One water policy expert gives her suggestions for improving the country’s water infrastructure. Then, how housing market trends are influencing a long-running home and garden show. Later, should football players not be worthy of our sympathy over head injuries? Plus, musician John Sieger joins us for the Monthly Beat Down.

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Thursday on Lake Effect:

Tim Cullen reflects on his life both in and out of politics and the ways Wisconsin’s political landscape has changed. Our astronomy contributor has some rules of thumb for figuring out what's a star and what's a planet in the night sky. And why Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar accepted a four-year contract with the Milwaukee Rep.

Guests:

  • Tim Cullen, former Democratic State Senator
  • Jean Creighton, astronomy contributor
  • Ayad Akhtar, playwright

Segments:

Wednesday on Lake Effect:

Being a cheerleader or dance team member for a pro sports team is a coveted position for many women. But a report just out says there are a lot of people who don't know what they're getting into, and it's not good. Then, essayist Art Cyr says the lessons of George Orwell’s 1984 are just as relevant today. The central characters in Sara Baume's first novel are a man who's had a tough life and a one-eyed dog – we find out why. And Tamra Keith explains why she was an NPR supporter well before she was an NPR White House correspondent.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect:

The White House turns to Milwaukee for expertise on water policy. Then, a photographer depicts women and the books they’re reading. Our ‘Fit For You’ segment heads to a trampoline park in Waukesha. And a roundtable Precious Lives conversation about why there are no easy solutions to the city’s gun violence issues.

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Monday on Lake Effect:

The Public Policy Forum looks at how Milwaukee’s marijuana laws are enforced. Later, a meteorologist says we’re entering a brave new atmosphere in the 21st Century. Plus, the lengths two Muslim fashion bloggers go to be fashionable and respectful of their faith. And an art museum wants you to look at paintings for a longer period of time.

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This weekend on Lake Effect:

Our Project Milwaukee series on innovation looks west to silicon valley to see what lessons this region can take from that success. Then, we get an international perspective on how well Milwaukee is doing when it comes to creating a positive entrepreneurial environment. And the co-founders of a movie-based business in Bay View lament the short-sightedness of eliminating the state’s tax incentives for the film industry.

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Friday on Lake Effect:

All this week, we’ve brought you stories from our latest Project Milwaukee series, Innovation: How Do We Compete? It explores both the City's assets and challenges as it attempts to carve a niche within a quickly changing national and international economy. Today our series continues with our forum on the future of innovation in Milwaukee.

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Thursday on Lake Effect:

Our Project Milwaukee series on innovation continues with a look at both cutting edge energy research taking place here, plus the roles higher education institutions play. Then, our foreign policy contributor talks about why we should care about the rise of terrorism in Africa. Lake Effect essayist Jonathan West considers the humble parking meter. And for Milwaukee musician Jeannine Rivers, tells us why the sacrifices of doing music full time are worth it.

Guests:

*All of today's scheduled Lake Effect segments will be aired later in the week due to the live coverage of President Obama's nomination for the new Supreme Court Justice. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your understanding.

Tuesday on Lake Effect:

Our Project Milwaukee series on innovation continues – we talk about one company’s difficult efforts to hang onto young talent. Plus, we listen back to a performance by a group who will play for the President. Then, while gun violence is a politically charged issue, one playwright thinks she’s found a way to make it less so. And we take another look at gun violence for the latest installment in Precious Lives.

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Monday on Lake Effect:

Today on the program, our Project Milwaukee series on innovation looks at the influence of place on genius. Later, prepare to be itchy, as we look at the myth and reality of so-called “super lice.” Then, our food contributor explores how to make CSAs work for your kitchen. Plus, Milwaukee poet John Koethe reads from his new collection, which comes out this week.

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This weekend on Lake Effect:

Today on the show, a reporter spends three days immersed in the world of restorative justice in Wisconsin and emerges with its remarkable story. Then, people seem to love to go to concerts featuring film music with film clips, especially when it’s Star Trek. Plus we’ll have the latest episodes of Radio Chipstone and our storytelling series Ex Fabula.

Guests:

Friday on Lake Effect:

A chat with the outspoken sociology professor leaving UW in the wake of its tenure changes. Then, a Wisconsin farmer who sees a metaphor for his work in Of Mice and Men. Our film critic discusses the winner of the Best Foreign Film Oscar. And Splinter Group’s production of Shipwrecked wants to take you on a wild ride back to when you used to slay dragons with a cardboard sword

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Thursday on Lake Effect:

We look at the impact of Act 10, five years after it became law. Then, two Wisconsin authors works to make children’s literature representative of all the kids who read it. Comedian Paula Poundstone discusses politics, internet dating, and dying her hair ahead of her stand-up performance at the Pabst this Saturday. Plus we catch up with the founders of Milwaukee’s Mad Hot Ballroom dance project for kids, and meet the Tasmanian based playwright of the The Snow, currently onstage at First Stage Children’s Theatre.

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