Marketplace

Airs Weekdays at 6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In 30-minutes, Marketplace breaks down the day's business and economic news. With a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, the stories range from impacting your wallet to Wall Street. Marketplace Morning Report presents the morning business news at 5:50 and 7:50 am weekdays. MMR is hosted by David Brancaccio.

Distributed by: American Public Media

Tight labor market, tight … jeans?

8 hours ago

It’s a tight labor market out there – so in a quest to attract workers, Walmart is trying out something new – allowing workers on the stores’ floors to wear jeans and solid shirts in any color. The new policy is being tested in less than two dozen stores. 

 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Seven months after Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico is still recovering

8 hours ago

It's been seven months since Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, and the island is still facing some serious problems. This week, an islandwide power outrage left most of Puerto Rico in the dark. And teachers along with parents have been protesting the Education Department's plan to close 283 schools. Host Kai Ryssdal checks in with Marketplace reporter Lizzie O'Leary on the latest news of Puerto Rico's recovery. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

The rent is too damn high, according to a new Pew report

9 hours ago

In 2015, 38 percent of renter households spent more than 30 percent of their gross income on housing, according to a new report released today by Pew Charitable Trusts. The Pew report said high rates of families living in such a precarious financial state threatens the long-term economic mobility of American families, and has implications for the economy as a whole.

Maria Walkenbach lives in Detroit with her four dogs, just around the corner from the construction site for the Gordie Howe International Bridge, being built across the Detroit River to Canada. Walkenbach’s been here, in the home she inherited from her mother-in-law, for almost 20 years.

“My husband actually passed away in this home. So, there's a lot of memories in this home. And now that I'm looking to retire in another year or two, I want to start fresh,” Walkenbach said.

On May 19, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will marry. The couple will wed in St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle — a royal residence in the small town of Windsor some 22 miles west of central London.

The bells of St. George’s will chime to mark the happy event, but the cash tills are already ringing. 

Tourism is by far Windsor’s biggest industry. Thanks to the royals, 7 million visitors flock to the town every year, and an extra 100,000 are expected on the wedding day, boosting the local economy.

04/19/2018: Puerto Rico is still recovering

10 hours ago

Sometimes you've got a plan for reporting out a story, then circumstances change your mind. That's what happened to Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O'Leary, who's in Puerto Rico this week. She was in the middle of reporting an update on how the island is recovering after last year's hurricanes, then the lights went out ... everywhere. We got Lizzie on the phone today to talk about how things are going. But first, the latest on the AT&T-Time Warner trial — and reminder of what's at stake. Plus: the business of a royal wedding.

(Markets Edition) The International Monetary Fund — which gets called to the rescue when economies melt down — meets in Washington. We'll talk to Diane Swonk, chief economist at the firm Grant Thornton, about one especially big worry that's looming: world debt. And the leader of that happens to be the U.S. Afterwards, we'll look at why rivals Amazon and Best Buy are partnering to sell televisions, and then we'll explore how a rise in trawlers off the coast of Senegal is causing local fishermen to lose their livelihoods.

Amazon and Best Buy are partnering to sell televisions. As part of the deal, Best Buy will sell Amazon smart TVs in their stores and on Amazon as a third-party merchant. What’s bringing two apparent rivals together to sell expensive gadgets to consumers?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

With the weekly jobless claims out Thursday, we look at whether the tight labor market is creating opportunities for younger workers. Are employers more willing to look at — and train — younger workers? And are young workers prepared for the jobs that are available?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) Central bankers and finance ministers from around the world are in Washington this week for the International Monetary Fund and World Bank's annual spring meeting. We'll look at some of the major concerns likely to be addressed, which include government debt.

The beach in Dakar, Senegal is empty except for a group of singing fishermen, pushing their colorful wooden boat back to shore. The windy weather has kept many on land today – including Mamadou Mbaye, head of Senegal’s fishermen union. He says the sea is depleted of fish because of foreign trawlers, and fishermen often work three straight months in order to make just under $20 a day – half of which goes to expenses like gasoline. And here’s no guarantee they’ll catch something. The fish, he adds, started to go away about ten years ago.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … New leadership in Zimbabwe hasn’t brought a new economic reality. This week, thousands of nurses went on strike and they’re threatening legal action if they aren’t reinstated. Then, a changing of the guard in Cuba and the first time in decades a Castro won’t be at the nation’s helm. But what does it mean for the country’s citizens and economic well-being? 

Many Americans rely on a cable provider to connect them to broadband internet, and streaming and other tech trends are changing the way we watch television. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Amanda Lotz about her new book, "We Now Disrupt This Broadcast," on the role of cable and the internet in transforming the way we are entertained.    

 

Why cutting the cord isn't so easy in the U.S.

20 hours ago

TV is changing all around us. Just last week, ESPN, a pillar of cable subscription bundles, launched its own streaming service, ESPN Plus. It’s just part of how streaming and other tech trends are changing the way we watch television. Old-fashioned cable subscriptions meanwhile seem like something out of "Land of the Lost." Given all that, it’s easy to forget that just a few years ago, the big disruptor in the TV industry was cable.

Is Instagram a healthier Facebook?

Apr 18, 2018

Facebook's data breach scandal  has turned off many of its users. But for Instagram, a company Facebook bought in 2012, the impact is almost minimal. Essentially the same company, Instagram seems to distance itself from Facebook — and it's working out pretty well.

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