UWM Today

Airs Thursdays from 1:30 to 2 pm & Sundays from 7:30 to 8 pm

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee plays a vital role in shaping the future of Milwaukee and Wisconsin. Meet the people behind the creativity and discoveries at UW-Milwaukee on UWM Today.

On the first Thursday of every month, WUWM's Dave Edwards talks to UWM's Chancellor Mark Mone on the Chancellor's Report.

Ways to Connect

Jason Rieve

When we walk into a room and switch on the lights we take what happens next for granted. In an instant, electricity powers lights, computers, air conditioning, TVs and so much more. But as reliable as the power system is, transmission lines can be knocked down during storms. Meanwhile, the U.S. military faces other challenges when it needs to establish a base in the middle of nowhere and reliable power systems aren’t available. So, what’s the solution?

Jason Rieve

As we age we all hope for a retirement with good health and security. But studies show that one in 10 Americans over the age of 65 experience neglect, exploitation or elder abuse — a startling statistic that should concern everyone.

WUWM's Dave Edwards Reflects On His Career

Jan 2, 2020
Helaine Hickson

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone turns the tables and interviews WUWM's General Manager Dave Edwards about his career as he prepares to retire from his position after more than 35 years.

Jason Rieve

Each week more than 200 people in the United States are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. They join more than 1 million other Americans who have contracted the disease. If you know someone with MS, you may have heard their stories of searching for a cure or looking for a treatment that will help relieve their symptoms.

On this edition of UWM Today, we talk with a UWM researcher who’s exploring the role that light therapy may have in helping MS victims. Jeri-Anne Lyons is a professor of biomedical sciences and the associate dean of UWM’s College of Health Sciences.

Jason Rieve

We all know air pollution is a health risk. We have invested billions of dollars in the U.S. trying to clean up the problem. But there are still a lot of unanswered questions about exactly what diseases and health conditions are caused by breathing polluted air.

Helaine Hickson

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone is joined by Brad Smith, president of Microsoft, to discuss the Connected System Institute at UWM and the impact of "big data" and cloud computing.

Jason Rieve

As we edge closer to winter, all of us most likely have a “to do” list before we settle in for the cold spell. And I suspect many of us – if we haven’t already done so – have getting a flu shot at or near the top of the list.

On this edition of UWM Today, we talk about the latest science on flu vaccines. It turns out not everyone gets the same benefits from the vaccine. Why not, and what can you do about the disparity? Helen Meier, assistant professor at UWM’s Zilber School of Public Health, is here to tell us.

Jason Rieve

The business of journalism has undergone dramatic changes in recent years. Today the daily newspaper is more likely to land on the screens of our smartphones than with a thud on the front porch. Those shifting media habits have had a profound effect on the news industry’s ability to monetize its product and the result has been dramatic — with layoffs and downsizing occurring across the country.  All forms of journalism have been affected, including sports reporting.

Reducing The Skill Gap In Southeastern Wisconsin

Nov 7, 2019
Helaine Hickson

On this program, we discuss the Higher Education Regional Alliance (HERA) and how it is designed to reduce the skill gap in southeastern Wisconsin by increasing employment rates and the number of post-secondary graduates in the region. Guests include Mark Mone, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Bryan Albrecht, president and CEO of Gateway Technical College; Danae Davis, executive director, Milwaukee Succeeds; and Kathleen Rinehart, president of Cardinal Stritch University.

Jason Rieve

This year marks UWM’s School of Architecture and Urban Planning’s 50th anniversary. It’s the only school of architecture in Wisconsin and one of the top programs of its kind in the country.

On this edition of UWM Today, we take a look at the tremendous impact UWM’s architecture school has had on communities throughout Wisconsin and beyond. Our guest is Bob Greenstreet, who recently announced some major news of his own. After serving 29 years as dean of the School of Architecture, he’s stepping down from his administrative post.

Jason Rieve

Milwaukee may still have a reputation for brewing beer, but here's a fact that may surprise you. Today, more people are employed in the film industry in Milwaukee than at all of the operating breweries combined in the city.

Jason Rieve

One of the best things about being on a college campus is the opportunity to see young artists both develop their skills and present their work to the community. UWM is fortunate to have the Peck School of the Arts — the only school of its kind in the University of Wisconsin System — where artists, musicians, actors, film makers and many others are deeply engaged in the creative process.

Jason Rieve

Fake news. It’s a label that’s tossed about on a daily basis. Fake news can be used as a way of questioning legitimate reporting when the facts don’t align with someone’s political position. President Trump does so regularly. Or it can describe the disinformation campaign countries like Russia are engaged in to undermine our election system.

Helaine Hickson

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone discusses the momentum that the university is building in the community, including partnerships with area businesses, the successful fundraising campaign, and a positive budget for 2019-2021. He also discusses higher education headwinds, including enrollment projections, the achievement gap, and demographics.

Jason Rieve

One of the miracles of manufacturing new products today is the use of nanomaterials — extremely small substances. Think of a piece of paper you’re holding in your hands. Look at the edge of the paper and imagine something 100,000 times smaller.

Nanomaterials are found in all kinds of products we every day, things like sunscreen, car paint, and clothing. While the tiny particles have dramatically improved the performance of many products, there’s a downside: Scientists are finding that nanomaterials are often being washed into our lakes and streams.

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