UWM Today

Airs Thursdays from 1:30 to 2 pm & Sundays from 7:30 to 8 pm

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee plays a vital role in shaping the future of Milwaukee and Wisconsin. Meet the people behind the creativity and discoveries at UW-Milwaukee on UWM Today.

On the first Thursday of every month, WUWM's Dave Edwards talks to UWM's Chancellor Mark Mone on the Chancellor's Report.

Ways to Connect

Jason Rieve

African American babies in Milwaukee are three times more likely to die before their first birthday than white babies. That means out of every 1,000 births in Milwaukee, 15 black babies will die compared to five white infants.

Any loss of a young life is heartbreaking, but the large number of African American infant deaths is indeed a tragedy. Why are the numbers so high? And what can be done to prevent those deaths?

Helaine Hickson

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone reflects on the past academic year that concluded with the 120th commencement ceremony involving more than 2,600 graduates. Mone also discusses other highlights including the addition of UW-Waukesha and UW-Washington County as satellite campuses of UW-Milwaukee and the Higher Education Regional Alliance.

Jason Rieve

A record number of women began serving in Congress this year. The milestone comes in the same year we celebrate the 100th anniversary of American women getting the right to vote.

On this edition of UWM Today, we look at the long circuitous route women have traveled to become full participants in our democratic process. It has been a journey filled with some fascinating stories, including the role Wisconsin played. Our guest today is Carolyn Eichner, associate professor of history and women’s and gender studies in the College of Letters and Science.   

Jason Rieve

If you are a history buff, Milwaukee is a great place to dive into the past. With its many ethnic neighborhoods and a lively political landscape, Milwaukee's history is fascinating.

Jason Rieve

With more than $60 billion worth of manufactured goods each year, Wisconsin is one of the country’s top manufacturing states. Many of the items produced here are exported to other countries around the world. The number of people employed in manufacturing industries is also impressive, as nearly a half million Wisconsinites make their living in this critical sector of the economy. That’s why the continued debate over tariffs imposed by our government is so important to people living in the Badger state.

Jason Rieve

This morning when you took a shower or flushed the toilet, you probably weren't thinking about the journey your waste water would take on its way to the sewerage treatment plant. Out of sight, out of mind.

Helaine Hickson

On today's program, a discussion about the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee as seen from various perspectives. In addition to Chancellor Mark Mone, we hear from graduating senior Simone Sharpe, Patricia Contreras, an alum of the university, and Pat Jensen, the parent of two UWM students.

Jason Rieve

Wisconsin has a great reputation for the quality of its workforce, with employees who are hardworking and dedicated to getting the job done right. While there are many leading companies in a wide variety of industries that employ Wisconsin workers, in recent years our state has not had a reputation as a good place to start a business. In fact, Wisconsin has consistently come in near the bottom of the lists that track entrepreneurs.

Jason Rieve

If you had the opportunity to attend college, you probably have some great memories of your days on campus. Some say college was one of the best experiences of their lives. But today, far too many college students are having an experience that is not something they expected: being hungry.

As the cost of college has gone up, more and more students find themselves cutting corners, such as buying books instead of bread. A recent survey of UWM students found that half of them had times when they didn’t know where their next meal was coming from.

Jason Rieve

At a time when there is a huge increase in the number of jobs in STEM related fields, the number of women entering those fields remains stagnant. It is a problem that has educators perplexed. The Mattel toy company has even created a line of Barbie dolls designed to stimulate girls’ interest in pursuing a career in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics — but with mixed results.

uwm-chancellor-uw-system-president
Helaine Hickson

Gov. Tony Evers' proposed budget holds promise and some challenges for higher education. UW System President Ray Cross and UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Monee discuss how the proposal would impact UWM and the challenges of funding the University System.

Jason Rieve

On April 7, countries around the globe will celebrate World Health Day. It is a time when health care professionals showcase the improvements that have been made in the health of people living around the world in the past year and a time to take stock of what still needs to be done.

Jason Rieve

During the Vietnam War the U.S. Air Force was involved in a secret mission to train a group of Hmong soldiers in Laos to fly military planes. It was part of a campaign by the CIA working behind the scenes in Laos. That program remained shrouded in mystery until the 1990s when Freedom of Information requests brought it to light. Up until now little has been know about the Hmong pilots who were working on behalf of the Americans in this covert action.

Jason Rieve

In a winter that seems especially long, most of us are asking whether spring will ever arrive. On this edition of UWM Today, we’re thinking warm thoughts about the weather as we spend time with one of the world’s leading authorities on climate studies: Mark Schwartz.

Helaine Hickson

Manufacturing is one of the most important and most competitive industries in Wisconsin. It employs hundreds of thousands of workers and accounts for the majority of our state's exports. But in order to remain competitive, manufacturing has to continue to adapt. The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee has launched the Connected Systems Institute to help. UWM Chancellor Mark Mone and Rockwell Automation's Director of Advanced Technologies Dave Vasko discuss how it works.

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