UWM Today

Airs Thursdays from 1:30 to 2 pm & Sundays from 7:30 to 8 pm

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee plays a vital role in shaping the future of Milwaukee and Wisconsin. Meet the people behind the creativity and discoveries at UW-Milwaukee on UWM Today.

On the first Thursday of every month, WUWM's Dave Edwards talks to UWM's Chancellor Mark Mone on the Chancellor's Report.

Ways to Connect

Jason Rieve

On this week's program, a discussion of the critical need for innovation and entrepreneurship in Milwaukee and the region. WUWM's Dave Edwards talks with UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone; Julia Taylor, president of the Greater Milwaukee Committee; and Sheldon Lubar. Mr. Lubar and his family donated $10 million to UWM to establish the Lubar Entrepreneurship Center.

Jason Rieve

Ten years ago, UWM became one of the first universities in the state to establish an office of sustainability to help the campus become more eco-friendly.

Today the campus is recognized nationally for its efforts to conserve energy and recycle.

On this edition of UWM Today, we’ll talk to the woman who is leading the sustainability program at the university - Kate Nelson.

Jason Rieve

When students head off to college it can be the start of the most exhilarating and challenging times of their lives. Among those challenges is finding a way to pay for it all.

While most students do a pretty good job figuring out the finances, there are still those surprises, like a car that breaks down or an unexpected medical bill, that can throw any financial plan off track.

Jason Rieve

Have you ever gone to the doctor feeling miserable and hoping to get some medication only to be told: “It’s a virus… antibiotics won’t help”?

One of the challenges in treating viral infections is that viruses themselves are incredibly difficult to understand. But a team of scientists at UW-Milwaukee have helped develop an amazing technique to not only see viruses, but to create three-dimensional movies showing how viruses infect healthy cells.

HELAINE HICKSON

UW-Milwaukee publicly launched its most ambitious fund-rising campaign in its 61 year history, with a goal to raise $200 million. Chancellor Mark Mone discussed the three priorities for the money being raised and the 2017-2019 state budget, which was largely positive for UWM.

In about a month, another wonderful aspect of college life will begin to unfold at UWM. That’s when the basketball season gets underway.

This year the men’s team is being led by a new coach who arrived at UWM this summer. He is Pat Baldwin, who comes to us from Northwestern University. As an assistant coach, he helped lead Northwestern to the NCAA Tournament.

Jason Rieve

When a fire broke out in the MainStage Theater at UWM’s Peck School of the Arts earlier this year, it caused millions of dollars in damage. Fortunately no one was injured, but the fire could not have come at a worse time as students were headed into the closing weeks of the school year with final projects and performances.

Jason Rieve

While remarkable progress has been made in the fight against breast cancer, not everyone is benefiting from the improvements in survival rates. African American women have a 23% lower five year survival rate than their white counterparts.

Why the difference? Research shows physical exercise can play a vital role in improving the lives of breast cancer patients.

Helaine Hickson

University of Wisconsin System President Ray Cross joins UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone to discuss the benefits of attending a UW institution, the University's role in the Foxconn project and workforce development, plus an update on the 2017-2019 state budget.

Jason Rieve

When was the last time you walked in to your favorite coffee shop or restaurant and were greeted by your first name? It’s a good feeling, isn’t it?

But does that personal touch translate into increased sales for the shop owners? That’s one of the questions being asked by a UWM researcher who is looking into the psychology of personalization and what it means in our marketing driven culture.

Joining us in the studio on this edition of UWM Today is Tracy Rank-Christman, an assistant professor in the UWM Lubar School of Business.

Jason Rieve

While political debates over climate change regularly fill hours of time on TV talk shows, scientific evidence continues to show the change is real and accelerating.

One of the tools used to demonstrate how much our climate is changing is phenology, or the study of changes in plants and animals tied to shifts in the environment.

Jason Rieve

Throughout the past year, UWM Today has been celebrating the 60th anniversary of UWM with a closer look at the university’s 14 schools and colleges. As we head into the home stretch of our celebration, we focus today on one of the newest academic units – the Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health.

HELAINE HICKSON

Foxconn, one of the world's largest electronics manufacturers, has signed a memo of understanding with Governor Walker for a $10 billion factory in southeastern Wisconsin.

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone says the university can play a major role in providing skilled graduates to that and other companies planning an expansion in the state.

Also, the chancellor discusses how the leadership team has been working this summer to develop actions for strategic opportunities developed by university wide teams.

Jon Strelecki

One of the most remarkable pictures of economic development anywhere in the state of Wisconsin can be found in the heart of downtown Milwaukee. With the new Milwaukee Bucks arena taking shape, the Northwestern Mutual office building nearing completion and the sparkling Couture office and residential tower about to break ground, well over a billion dollars in real estate projects are underway.

This is just the beginning of what some are calling the renaissance of urban Milwaukee.

Jon Strelecki

In a few weeks, the first total solar eclipse on America’s mainland in nearly 40 years will occur as the moon passes between the Sun and the Earth.

Anticipation of this amazing astronomical event is causing a lot of excitement and interest in the study of our stars. On this edition of UWM Today we have a special guest who – pardon the pun – can shed light on the upcoming eclipse and talk about a wonderful resource at UWM that attracts thousands of people each year who want to learn more about astronomy.

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