higher education

UW-Waukesha/Facebook

Leaders in the University of Wisconsin system have new ideas about how to increase enrollment at state schools. UW System president Ray Cross is expected to publicly reveal a “restructuring” plan on Thursday. 

But a few details have come to light ahead of time -- including a proposal to merge each of the system’s two-year schools with their nearest four-year campus.

University of Wisconsin

It’s back to school time and many kids are making transitions: perhaps entering kindergarten, middle or high school, or maybe a new district. But one of the biggest changes comes in that fall when a son or daughter heads off to be a college freshman.

Lake Effect contributor Jessie Garcia has been documenting two families from Shorewood for the past four months. Each was getting ready to launch their eldest away from the nest for the first time, and Garcia introduces us to their stories in this feature.

Photo by James Stukenberg/Milwaukee Magazine

As technology develops, the “world of work” is trying to keep up. And one unlikely hero has been quietly working to fill that gap: technical colleges.

As a state that once was a leader in manufacturing and factory jobs, Wisconsin has experienced the rapid pace of economic change firsthand. Like many other job markets, Wisconsin now faces a skills gap.

And tech colleges, traditionally known and created to train for careers in the blue-collar trades, have made moves over the past several years to expand their role, creating programs for newer, middle-skill positions.

ADELIE FREYJA ANNABEL, FLICKR

As Wisconsin's legislature struggles to finish its biennial budget, the UW Board of Regents has already approved its financial blueprint for the upcoming year.

Mount Mary University

The topic of leadership comes up a lot when we talk about education.

What makes a good school leader? What qualities should he or she possess, in order to take charge of staff, students, alumni, and a greater school community?

This is something the folks at Milwaukee’s Mount Mary University have thought a lot about in the past year. That’s because the Catholic, all-women’s school has been deep in the search process for a new university president.

When young adults set out to pick a college back in 2010 and 2011, they were making a decision of a lifetime amid big financial obstacles: soaring tuition and the great recession.

And as they progressed through their college careers, a debate over the value of college grew louder.

A long held mantra – that the best investment is a good education – is increasingly being called into question. Some politicians, high-profile entrepreneurs and even educators, have become publicly skeptical of the worth of a degree that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to obtain.

When he first moved to Miami, Waltter Teruel says, working as a recruiter for ITT Technical Institute was a welcome change from his life in New York where he had been selling antiques and life insurance.

As a recruiter, Teruel says, ITT Tech took care of the pitch to potential students for you. Recruiters used scripts set out in detailed PowerPoint presentations and got long lists of prospective students to call. But soon the welcome change faded. "Most of these students, they were looking for a job," not more school, says Teruel.

Rachel Morello

The last time we heard from Sara Goldrick-Rab, her business cards read "professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison."

This time around, she has a different title.

Rachel Morello

The school year was about to begin a few weeks ago, then it abruptly ended for scores of students at ITT Technical Institute. The for-profit college system announced it was closing its campuses nation-wide, including two in Wisconsin, after numerous states accused ITT of fraud.

Rachel Morello

Applying to college can be a daunting process.

Applications, essays and financial aid forms add up to plenty of paperwork. And then, there’s the wait. All told, it can take several months – and plenty of stress – before a student finds out if they’ve been accepted.

michaeljung, fotolia

Tens of thousands of graduates are either entering the workforce or searching for their place in it.

And if you're a new grad looking for a job, these may be some of the best words you'll hear this spring:

"There will be an increase that pretty much brings us back to the levels of employment for recent grads that occurred before the recession."

That's Jean Salzer, director of UWM's Career Planning & Resource Center. She’s talking about predictions from the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Fotolia

It’s graduation season, which also means it’s the season of commencement speeches. A time when celebrities take the stage, armed with jokes and wisdom for millions of young people entering the workforce.

uwimages/Fotolio

Alverno Presents has made a lasting mark on Milwaukee’s performing arts scene. For 57 years, the presenting organization has worked out of the Alverno College campus to bring innovative modern dance companies, world class jazz, and world music to Milwaukee audiences.

Keith Cooper / Flickr

Tuition and other college costs have risen astronomically and grants and other forms of non-debt aid haven’t kept pace. It’s not uncommon for students across the country today to graduate with crushing balances owed to the federal government and to private lenders – the latter often at high interest rates.

Wisconsin hasn’t escaped the trend. According to Bruce Murphy, editor at Urban Milwaukee, the percentage of debt incurred by Wisconsin’s students rose sharply in the past decade – faster than all but 6 other states.

S Bence

Every year the Catholic, liberal arts college for women on Milwaukee’s south side hosts a community conference. Alverno psychology professor Joyce Tang Boyland was part of the team who put together this year’s A Tapestry of Sustainability event.

The conference takes place all day Friday on the Alverno College campus and folds in speakers, including former Milwaukee mayor John Norquist.

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