history

Courtesy of the Pabst Mansion

This weekend’s Doors Open Milwaukee allows visitors into some remarkable spaces that are not typically open to the public. But there are other, remarkable spaces around the city that people can visit annually. Take the Pabst Mansion, an example of the Gilded Age that has stood for more than a century on Milwaukee's near-west side.

bookstore-milwaukee-airport-renaissance-books
Maayan Silver

Walk into the public area of Milwaukee’s General Mitchell International Airport, and you’ll see traditional airport sights: monitors for departures, places to grab coffee and food. But you’ll also see a 2,600-square-foot used bookstore, Renaissance Books.

The latest Bubbler Talk — our series that allows you to ask WUWM questions about Milwaukee —  takes us to the bookshop. Question asker Susie Hoglund, of Shorewood:

Jimmy Emerson, DVM/Flickr

When you look at a map of Wisconsin, it’s covered in names that remind us of this country’s original inhabitants. Milwaukee, Wauwatosa, Waukesha, Kinnickinnic — all words derived from Native American languages.

Another is Oconomowoc, about 30 miles west of Milwaukee. This week’s Bubbler Talk questioner, Jeff Dittel, moved there about two and a half years ago.

civil-rights-eagles-club-milwaukee-protest-history
Courtesy of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

What was the Eagles Ballroom before it became The Rave? That’s a question we’ve heard a lot at Bubbler Talk and it turns out there are a lot of answers.

The Eagles Club on Wisconsin Avenue was first completed in 1926. It was the headquarters for the Milwaukee Aerie of the Fraternal Order of the Eagles – a national social organization with a rather illustrious history.

Thoreau's Nearly-Forgotten Stay In Milwaukee

Jul 10, 2018
Mitch Teich

When stopping for coffee in Walker’s Point and happen past a familiar face from literary history, don’t be surprised. A plaque dedicated to the memory of philosopher and author Henry David Thoreau is located outside of Colectivo Coffee at 170 South 1st Street.

During his 1861 journey to Mackinac Island, Thoreau stayed at the Lakehouse Hotel, noting in his journal the hefty price of 75 cents per night. The plaque, dedicated in 2014 by local poets and performers, honors Thoreau’s impact on both Martin Luther King, Jr. and Mahatma Gandhi.

There has been a lot of effort in the last decade to denote Milwaukee as a so-called “world water hub.” To date, many companies that research water and water-related technology have chosen to locate in the region, but the importance of water to the area is hardly new. 

Q. M. Sgt. Leon H. Caverly/Army / Wikimedia

As we approach the centenniel anniversary of Armistice Day, there has been a growing conversation about the impact the first World War had on the U.S. and the world as a whole. Now celebrated as Veterans Day, the war famously ended at the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month in 1918. 

Pfister Hotel

The Pfister Hotel has always been a place of opulence and luxury. During its 125 year history, it has been host to countless important events and dignitaries, including visits from Prussian royalty and American presidents. Now, Anna Lardinois has the chance to share and become a part of the hotel's history.

Courtesy of UWM Cultural Resource Management

From 1882 until 1974, the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery served as the burial site of many of Milwaukee’s marginalized citizens. The cemetery became the final resting place for many of the community’s poor, as well as those who died as a resident of one of the county institutions or were unidentified or unclaimed from the coroner’s office.

Michail Takach

1968 was a pivotal year for so many facets of American culture, from the anti-war and civil rights movements, to rapidly changing musical styles, to women’s rights. It was also a time of great change in America’s gay society. While the Stonewall riots in New York City didn’t happen until a year later, 1968 was a crucial year in Milwaukee’s gay history, especially in the Walker’s Point neighborhood.

Simon & Schuster

There are some notable addresses and iconic homes around the United States, but one has stood the test of time and remains the largest home on U.S. soil.  The Biltmore Estate, built in the late 19th century in Ashville, North Carolina, is a colossal mansion built by George Vanderbilt.

Wikimedia Commons

Most talk about weapons today involves firearms.  But one Milwaukee museum curator wanted to examine how our weaponry even evolved to firearms. Through exploring humans and their behavior, Milwaukee Public Museum Anthropology Collections Curator Dawn Scher Thomae sees the weapon as a tool that has evolved over thousands of years to solve a problem.

Aisha Turner

This week’s Bubbler Talk is rooted deep in Wisconsin history... in the story of escaped slave Joshua Glover. Glover fled Missouri for Wisconsin in 1852 and was imprisoned in Milwaukee under the Fugitive Slave Law.

You can see parts of his story driving on Fond du Lac towards Milwaukee’s downtown. A large mural spans the walls of the I-43 underpass. It depicts abolitionists storming the jail, helping Glover escape to freedom in Canada.

Wikimedia Commons

Today is the first Tuesday in November, which is typically the fall election day in this country. A year ago, Donald Trump was elected president, and a year from today, people will go to the polls in Wisconsin to vote in the gubernatorial, Congressional, Senate, and state legislative races.

Dennis Andersen

Folk singer Arlo Guthrie doesn't mind if "Alice's Restaurant" is still the first thing that pops to mind when you hear his name.  Guthrie doesn't play it at every show - in fact, he's not planning to play it in Milwaukee Friday night.  But he understands that his fans' love for a fifty-year-old song is as much about themselves as it is about the songwriter.

Pages