immigration

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is proposing to lift court-imposed limits on how long it can hold children in immigration detention.

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

Congressional Republicans keep trying to downplay the possibility of a government shutdown this fall, just weeks ahead of midterm elections, even as President Trump returns again and again to that very scenario.

Teran Powell

This year’s Independence Day may have a new meaning for some state residents. That’s because hundreds of Wisconsinites recently became American citizens.

Today, they’ll be celebrating their first 4th of July holiday as such.

I attended the swearing in ceremony for soon-to-be U.S. citizens a few weeks ago, at the Peck Pavilion at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts in Milwaukee. It was held in conjunction with Flag Day.

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET

In a 5-4 ruling that gave broad leeway to presidential authority, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban that barred nearly all travelers from five mainly Muslim countries as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

The president's proclamation was "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority under the INA," the court wrote in its majority opinion, referring to the Immigration and Nationality Act.

"A moment of profound vindication"

Updated at 1:42 p.m. ET

Despite pressure from President Trump for the U.S. to arrest and prosecute anyone caught crossing the border illegally, U.S. Customs and Border Protection says its agents will temporarily suspend the practice of detaining adults who arrive with children — something that had been a tenet of Trump's "zero tolerance" policy.

Updated at 12:13 p.m. ET

The Pentagon will build tent camps at two U.S. military bases to house people who cross the southern border illegally, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Monday.

The defense chief did not give details about which bases would contain the temporary camps. However, NPR's Tom Bowman reports that the two military bases are in Texas.

Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday to end his controversial policy that has resulted in thousands of family separations and brought criticism from Democrats and Republicans.

"We're going to keep families together but we still have to maintain toughness or our country will be overrun by people, by crime, by all of the things that we don't stand for and that we don't want," Trump said Wednesday morning, when he announced that he would sign the order.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET Wednesday

Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry.

On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy of separating families — and replacing it with a policy of detaining entire families together, including children, but ignoring legal time limits on the detention of minors.

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally.

Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes.

As the number of migrant children detained by the U.S. government grows to almost 2,000 minors, Trump administration officials defended the policy of separating children from their parents and authorities announced plans to house several hundred juveniles in a temporary tent shelter near El Paso, Texas.

May Day in Waukesha: 'A Day Without Latinxs & Immigrants'

May 7, 2018
Claudia Delgadillo

Last week, thousands of people gathered to march for A Day Without Latinxs & Immigrants in Waukesha. The first of May is also known as May Day, which is celebrated to honor workers in many countries.

People from across Wisconsin marched to support immigrants' right and in opposition of the 287(g) program that Waukesha's Sheriff Eric Severson applied for last year. This program allows the sheriff to train his deputies as immigration agents; however, the sheriff's model would only be enforced in the county jails. 

Smith1979 / Fotolia

Many immigrants’ rights supporters implore people to think of immigrants not in terms of nationality or country of origin, but rather, simply as fellow human beings.

Empathy towards other fellow humans is at the heart of Raveen Arora’s message. Arora is a former refugee, who once worked with Mother Teresa and now lives in Arizona and heads the Think Human Global Initiative.

Teran Powell

Thousands of people marched in Waukesha Tuesday for the annual A Day Without Latinxs and Immigrants in Wisconsin.

The demonstration is usually held in Milwaukee, but this year’s organizers moved it to Waukesha.

People from across the state participated in support of immigrants’ rights, but also in opposition to 287(g). The latter is a program that would allow local law enforcement to act as Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents.

Lacy Landre

Milwaukee history is inextricably linked to immigration, from the first German, French, and English immigrants who shaped the city’s founding, to Polish and Irish immigrants that helped build it into an industrial powerhouse, to the Latino immigrants that have redefined the near south side.

President Trump is already tweeting his displeasure about a Supreme Court decision that makes it more difficult to deport a small number of lawful permanent residents convicted of crimes.

In a 5-to-4 decision Tuesday, the court overturned the deportation of a 25-year legal U.S. resident from the Philippines who was convicted of two burglaries.

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