Lake Effect

 

Friday on Lake Effect:

How did dogs come to play such an important role in search-and-rescue missions?  And what makes a good canine-human team?  Plus, a new collection of short stories from Milwaukee writer Liam Callanan, a trip to maple sugaring season at Riveredge Nature Center, and an in-studio performance from Michigan’s Greensky Bluegrass.

Guests:

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts

There are a number of great classic ballets that almost everyone has heard about: Sleeping Beauty, The Nutcracker, Swan Lake

Giselle is on that list as well. It’s a typical fairytale story: a young peasant girl falls in love with a nobleman pretending to be a peasant and dies of fright when his true identity is revealed. The second act is all about anger and revenge, and ultimately forgiveness.

Dennis Brekke / Flickr

With debate over the state budget continuing, Wisconsin legislators are hearing from public school administrators around the state who are concerned about significant proposed cuts to K-12 education spending.

But funding is not the only hot-button education issue on the legislature's agenda. There are also debates over standardized testing, Common Core standards, integration programs, and voucher and charter schools.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Between the recent Israeli elections to the deteriorating situation in Yemen, the Middle East is in the news again.

Our foreign policy contributor Art Cyr spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich to put things into context, starting with the root problems creating a potential path to civil war in Yemen:

Lake Effect contributor Art Cyr is Professor of Political Economy and World Business and the Director of the A.W. Claussen Center for World Business at Carthage College in Kenosha.

Jessica Z Schafer / RAM

Take some sugar, some corn syrup, gelatin, and potassium sorbate and you have…art? 

Brad Wilson / Flickr

Even before Hurricane Katrina changed just about everything in New Orleans, the state of Louisiana had started the process of reshaping the city’s public schools, creating an entity known as the New Orleans Recovery School District.  But the storm sped up the process and was used as the catalyst for nearly a wholesale state takeover of control of schools there.

Uriel Sinai / Getty Images

Last week was a great one for fans of the aurora borealis.  The Northern Lights were visible far further south than normal, thanks to increased solar activity. Ambient light made seeing them basically impossible in metro Milwaukee, but out in the country, there were lots of sightings.

So what’s responsible for the shimmering, colorful atmospheric magic?  Astronomy contributor and director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee, Jean Creighton, explained to Bonnie North exactly how they work - starting with two basic ingredients: the sun and the earth's atmosphere.

Imagined Reality / Flickr

In the past, Lake Effect's "It's a Material World" segment has looked at what happens to beloved objects when their owners passed away.

However, contributor Gianofer Fields is flipping that question on its head to find out what happens to a collector when her collection of objects has disappeared?

Fields' good friend and fellow Wisconsinite Jen Jeneric says she isn't much of a collector and the state of her precious collection of playing cards proves that point. 

"Probably about 20 years ago I went to Niagra Falls and I bought a set of playing cards there that was round and had pictures from Niagra Falls, and I loved those playing cards. And I started noticing other playing cards when I went out places, so I started collecting playing cards. I have probably twenty decks of playing cards, but I have no idea where they are," says Jeneric.

Jeneric says that doesn't mean she doesn't miss the pieces she hand-selected, but she also doesn't feel any anxiety over her lost collection.

"I don't feel like I need to know where they are. Knowing that I have them and that one day I'll see them again is really all I need."

Ed Schipul / Flickr

Many of us collect things - from stamps to movie ticket stubs, glassware to baseball cards - and our collections vary in intensity and size. For the past couple of weeks, material culture contributor Gianofer Fields has been exploring the lives of collectors and their connection with the objects they love. But she found herself wondering, what happens to a collection when the collector is gone?

The question was inspired by the collection that Wisconsinite Sam SanFallippo kept in the basement of his funeral home – a collection that Fields calls the best kept non-secret of Madison.

The basement of the Cress Funeral Home was home to hundreds of taxidermy specimens. You could find everything from stuffed sail fish to red eye squirrels driving a pink Cadillac on a freeway of love in the afterlife.

SanFallippo passed away last year. His funeral home was sold and the collection needed to find a new home. In this installment of it's a material world, Fields sets out to discover what happened to his collection.


Ostia / Flickr

There are three basic things that people need to survive food, shelter, and, clothing. How we choose to fulfill those needs gives others in our communities clues about who we are. But contributor Gianofer Fields says it's the stuff we don't need, the non essentials, that tell the bigger story. She paid a visit to the home of Madisonian and avid toy collector David Pouncey. 

"Once I had two or three of them, then you can't just have two or three. So then I just start looking around for them, and it just grows and sometimes it gets out of hand," says Pouncey.

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