police

vincent desjardins / Wikimedia

The American Civil Liberties Union released an in-depth analysis Milwaukee Police Department records Wednesday. The ACLU says it found a pattern of problems with how stops in Milwaukee are being conducted.

Outside experts found that nearly half of the vehicular stops they analyzed failed to cite a probable cause. For pedestrian stops, it was nearly 60 percent.

VINCENT DESJARDINS, FLICKR

The American Civil Liberties Union is accusing the Milwaukee Police Department of violating the rights of people of color by engaging in unconstitutional stops.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK

The Milwaukee County District Attorney is investigating the death of a 22-year-old West Milwaukee man who died after being tased by police.

Adam Trammell suffered from schizophrenia, so mental health advocates are watching the case develop.

Officers entered Trammell's home last May, after receiving calls from a neighbor that he was behaving erratically. He was tased repeatedly and died soon after he was taken to the hospital.

Prosecutors are reviewing possible criminal charges against three West Milwaukee police officers who allegedly used a stun gun on a man suffering from mental illness -- who later died. A medical examiner's report says the use of taser shocks led to the death of 22-year-old Adam Trammel in West Milwaukee last May. 

Teran Powell

Milwaukee’s search for an interim police chief is down to two candidates - Inspector Michael Brunson and Captain Alfonso Morales. 

Assistant Police Chief James Harpole withdrew his candidacy and announced his retirement days before the three were set to attend a public forum.

Last night, the two remaining candidates had the chance to answer questions from the community, and explain how their experiences in law enforcement would influence their role as chief.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Police Department

Ahead of his retirement, Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn sat down with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich for a wide-ranging discussion about his time in office, the issues confronting Milwaukee today, and the challenges that will face the next Chief of Police.

Flynn’s tenure has been an eventful one. Violent crime has fallen, risen, and fallen again in the last decade. There have been several high-profile officer-involved shootings that have strained the relationship between some members of the community and members of the force.

Teran Powell

Milwaukee’s search for an interim police chief is on.

With just a few weeks before Chief Edward Flynn retires, the Fire and Police Commission has started interviews. Meanwhile city officials are expressing what they want in a chief.

Throughout Edward Flynn's 10 years in office, his supporters defended his approach to tracking and fighting crime.

MEGAN DOBYNS

The Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission has exactly one month to name an acting replacement for Police Chief Edward Flynn. Flynn recently announced that he will retire from his position on February 16. Now, the Commission must name an acting chief, even as it goes about the business of hiring a new chief for a full four-year term.

George Kelling will likely watch this search from a distance, but with interest. Kelling is a retired police researcher and professor emeritus at Northeastern University and Rutgers University, and a fellow for 20 years at Harvard University.

gbbrowning / Fotolia

Members of the Milwaukee Police and Fire Commission will meet later this week to discuss the process of appointing an acting chief of police. That meeting comes a few days after current Police Chief Edward Flynn announced his retirement.

Flynn has been the chief of police for the past decade and will step down six weeks from now.

READ: Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn to Retire

Marti Mikkelson

The chair of the Milwaukee Common Council’s Public Safety committee didn’t mince words Tuesday, when he outlined the qualities he would like to see in the next police chief. Ald. Bob Donovan has been a longtime critic of Chief Edward Flynn, who announced he’ll be retiring next month. 

Donovan gave what he called the “State of Public Safety in the City” address at City Hall on Tuesday. It included what he wants to see in the next police chief, and also a broader plan for reducing crime.

Teran Powell

Edward Flynn, the embattled chief of Milwaukee's Police Department, will retire from his post next month. Flynn’s current term was due to continue through January of 2020.

The Milwaukee Police Department confirmed news of Flynn's retirement Monday afternoon, after initial reports had surfaced:

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Violent crime is up across the country, including in Milwaukee, according to US Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He held a press conference in Milwaukee Tuesday at the federal courthouse to address crime trends, and promised new measures, he said, will reduce crime rates.

Sessions said violent crime had been down for a couple of decades, but has gone up in the last two years, and he said it’s not a light matter.

The state Assembly passed a bill Thursday that would restrict public access to police body camera footage. Those videos often are used in trial to help determine guilt or innocence.

In some cases, they’ve been released to the public when an officer is accused of wrongdoing – including in the trial for former Milwaukee police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown. He was acquitted earlier this year in the shooting death of Sylville Smith in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

Megan Dobyns

Update: 

The Milwaukee Common Council voted 10-5 Tuesday to override the mayor's veto of a resolution that would give aldermen the authority to fire the Police Chief.

The move doesn't give the council a green light to remove Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn from office. Rather, they would have to approve his firing, with a two-thirds vote. And, before that could take place, state lawmakers would also need to take action.

Alderman Bob Donovan was in the majority. And, before the vote, he said the city is in need of change.

Having police officers wear little cameras seems to have no discernible impact on citizen complaints or officers' use of force, at least in the nation's capital.

That's the conclusion of a study performed as Washington, D.C., rolled out its huge camera program. The city has one of the largest forces in the country, with some 2,600 officers now wearing cameras on their collars or shirts.

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