politics

Win McNamee / Getty Images

Former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said he won't run for office again in 2022 because he has accepted a new full-time job running a group based in Washington, D.C., that promotes conservative ideas among young people.

The Republican had been openly considering running for his old job as governor or for U.S. Senate in 2022. But Walker told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in a story published Monday that his job as president of the Young America's Foundation, which is based in the Washington area, will make it impossible for him to run for office in 2022.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

A group of four women lawmakers responded to attacks by President Trump with a news conference of their own on Monday evening.

Earlier in the day, Trump said the members of Congress are "free to leave" the country if they are unhappy with the U.S. and accused them of hating America.

Trump To Tout Trade, Economy In Formerly Blue Wisconsin

Jul 12, 2019
Alex Wong / Getty Images

Updated at 3:48 p.m. CT

President Donald Trump is calling on Congress to pass a new trade agreement with Canada and Mexico and send it to his desk immediately. He says, "We shouldn't be playing around."

Trump is lobbying for passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement at Derco Aerospace Inc., in Milwaukee. He is on his sixth visit to the state since taking office.

Trump worries that passage of the agreement could get less likely with time, saying, "it gets more and more political because we get closer and closer to the election."

Courtesy of Univision

Several Democratic presidential hopefuls met Thursday night for a town hall organized by the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) in downtown Milwaukee.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, former HUD Secretary Julian Castro and former U.S. Rep.  Beto O’Rourke all spoke, as part of the four-day convention that’s drawn thousands of people. The discussion focused largely on immigration.

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET

President Trump announced an executive order on gathering citizenship information, a shift from an earlier effort to get a question about citizenship on the 2020 census.

Trump spoke alongside Attorney General William Barr, who praised his decision.

Alesandra Tejeda

Next year’s presidential election is on the minds of many people attending the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) convention in downtown Milwaukee. It runs through Saturday and up to 20,000 people from across the country are expected to attend. Many of the workshops are focused on political activism. 

Linda Chavez traveled here from Austin, Texas. She says health care, immigration and economic development are weighing on her mind:

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

President Trump announced Thursday he would sign an executive order to obtain data about the U.S. citizenship and noncitizenship status of everyone living in the United States.

In a Rose Garden ceremony, Trump said he would drop efforts to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census. Instead, his executive order will direct all U.S. agencies to provide the Department of Commerce all information they have on U.S. citizenship, noncitizenship and immigration status.

New Jersey is a decisively Democratic state, but last year Democratic lawmakers there decided to try to cement their power even further.

Hillary Clinton won by 14 percentage points in 2016. Barack Obama won by 17 percentage points before that, and a Republican hasn't won a Senate race there since 1972.

Even so, the state Legislature introduced a plan that would overhaul the map-making process in a way that would guarantee Republicans became a "permanent minority."

klenger / stock.adobe.com

The U.S. Supreme Court announced its long-awaited decision on partisan gerrymandering — the practice of writing maps to disadvantage certain political parties. Justice John Roberts wrote the majority opinion, finding that federal courts cannot remedy issues of partisan gerrymandering. The vote was 5-4, along ideological lines with the more conservative justices in the majority.

Updated at 4:16 p.m. ET

It is too soon to tell whether the much-hyped meeting between President Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un on Sunday will be remembered as a televised spectacle or the start of a breakthrough in talks with the nuclear-armed country.

But Trump did become the first sitting American president to venture into North Korea.

"I was proud to step over the line," Trump told Kim about crossing the demarcation line at the Demilitarized Zone that separates the two Koreas. "It is a great day for the world."

At the Democratic presidential debate this week, voters got a preview of how Democrats will handle what for now is an uphill battle against President Trump.

Alex Wroblewski / Getty Images

President Donald Trump is scheduled to formally announce his reelection bid Tuesday night. Democrats are already after the Republican to answer more questions about his policy on tariffs. Wisconsin U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin is one of the questioners.

President Trump tweeted this month that: 

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

On the day of his self-declared presidential campaign kickoff, President Trump is threatening to deport "millions" of immigrants in the United States illegally beginning "next week."

But what's known is far less definitive.

'Haze' Abounds As Michigan Struggles To Regulate Recreational Cannabis

Jun 17, 2019
Viktor Tollemar / Wisconsin Watch

Matthew Abel’s law firm bank account was shut down twice. He had to temporarily change the name of his Detroit firm from Cannabis Counsel to the generic Rivertown, PLC.

John Sinclair, a “radical poet” and national symbol of marijuana injustice, was sentenced to 10 years in prison in 1969 after passing two joints to an undercover narcotics officer.

The lineups are set for the first Democratic presidential primary debates.

Among the debate matchups: Former Vice President Joe Biden, currently leading in primary polls nationally, will face off against Vermont senator and 2016 candidate Bernie Sanders, as well as California Sen. Kamala Harris and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Meanwhile, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren will face New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

Pages