politics

Updated at 11:01 a.m. ET

Hours after President Trump announced tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods, China responded with its own levies on $60 billion worth of U.S. products.

Chinese state television on Tuesday reported that the government has decided to impose tariffs of 5 percent to 10 percent on $60 billion worth of U.S. products, starting on Monday. The tariffs will apply to 5,207 items.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort is close to reaching a plea deal that would avert a trial scheduled to start later this month in Washington, D.C.

No details were immediately available about the charges to which Manafort might plead guilty or whether he might cooperate with prosecutors, according to a person familiar with the matter. The person asked not to be identified.

The tentative deal was first reported on Thursday evening by ABC News.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

The White House is accusing Senate Democrats of an unfounded "11th hour attempt to delay" a vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, released a statement Thursday afternoon disclosing that she had referred "a matter" involving Kavanaugh to "federal investigative authorities."

House and Senate negotiators have agreed to a plan to avoid a shutdown fight weeks before the midterm elections in November.

Junior Hansen Jr.

While there are aspects of the news coming out of Washington that sound like satire, it’s hard to be sure. With Will Durst, an award-winning political satirist and Milwaukee native, you can be sure it's satire. Though he now lives in California’s Bay Area, Durst is back in his home state for shows in Madison and Milwaukee before touring in Europe.

"I know what you're going to ask and I don't know!" Durst says right off the bat. "I've heard that people are so tired of hearing about Trump, I've heard that people can't get enough of Trump."

Day 3 of the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Brett Kavanaugh featured a morning quarrel over documents as members concluded two days of public questioning of Kavanaugh. Here are some of the highlights:

1. Booker's gambit

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

House Speaker Paul Ryan called on the author of the widely read New York Times op-ed critical of President Trump to resign, arguing that the individual was "living in dishonesty."

The essay, posted Wednesday afternoon and attributed to a senior administration official, suggested that there is a group of high-level Trump administration officials working to stymie the president behind the scenes.

The confirmation of a Supreme Court justice is often a major event that ripples through American law for decades. But Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing, which opens Tuesday, is especially historic because, if confirmed, Kavanaugh is expected to solidify a hard-right majority on the nation's highest court, a majority the likes of which has not been seen since the early 1930s, and which is likely to dominate for a generation or more.

The death of John McCain represents something more than the death of a U.S. senator and an American military hero.

In this hotly partisan era, it also symbolizes the near-extinction of lawmakers who believe in seeking bipartisanship to tackle big problems.

STREETER LECKA / GETTY IMAGES

Milwaukee is one of three cities still competing to host the 2020 Democratic National Convention. Mayor Tom Barrett says that while Houston and Miami Beach have a lot going for them, Milwaukee makes the most sense.

“I think that the Midwest remains a battleground area for both parties, and I think both parties are interested in making sure that they are not forgotten in the ramp up to the 2020 elections,” he says.

The last eight years have represented a sea change in the Wisconsin political environment. The election of Scott Walker as governor in 2010 ushered in an era of Republican dominance at many levels, including the 2016 Presidential election. Donald Trump won Wisconsin, a result that surprised many national political observers.

The story of Wisconsin’s transformation is familiar to those who live in the state, but writer Dan Kaufman believes it also holds relevance to the rest of the country.

The election night map in 2016 brought many surprises, but none more stunning than Wisconsin's switch from blue to red — marking its first vote for a Republican presidential ticket since 1984.

Michigan and Pennsylvania also ended long Democratic streaks that night. But the Badger State was the big shock, because Barack Obama had carried it twice by comfortable margins and Hillary Clinton had led all through the fall in the most respected statewide poll.

Slate

Note: You can find the full audio from Leon Neyfakh's on-stage interview in Milwaukee at the bottom of this post.

The news these days is filled with stories of high-level leaks, dirty tricks, and a President with a habit of saying things you wouldn't expect to hear from a Chief Executive.

Streeter Lecka / Getty Images

Rank-and-file Democrats and loyal Republicans don't agree on much in Wisconsin. But a new effort to lure a major event to Milwaukee has won approval from both sides of the aisle. 

The Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce - a generally pro-business and often politically conservative group - is backing a bid to lure the 2020 Democratic National Convention to Milwaukee. Prominent Democrats are behind the effort as well, including Mayor Tom Barrett. Advocates say it would bring in tens of thousands of visitors and hundreds of millions of dollars in economic impact.

Paul Drinkwater / NBCUniversal via Getty Images

Oprah Winfrey’s speech at the Golden Globe Awards last weekend spurred almost immediate speculation by many about whether the celebrity would make a strong presidential candidate. In the days since, political analysts and regular people alike have debated whether her political skills would differ greatly from our current president, who also came from well outside the political sphere.

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