President Trump

Emily Files / WUWM

Some Wisconsin residents are speaking out against the supporters of President Donald Trump who rioted at the U.S. Capitol last Wednesday. The extremists interrupted the certification of the presidential election. Five people died as a result of the chaos.

In Milwaukee Sunday, a group of about 50 people gathered for what they called a “rally against the far right.”

Win McNamee / Getty Images

The mob of Trump supporters at the U.S. Capitol Wednesday brought out strong reactions from across the world. Part of that reaction came from current and past members of Wisconsin's Congressional delegation.

Rep. Ron Kind (D - LaCrosse) held an online news conference from his Capitol Hill office.

"I'm here, I'm working, I'm not ceding any ground to anyone. I refuse to surrender the United States Capitol to anyone,” he said.

Updated Sunday at 8:23 a.m. ET

Jobless benefits that were expanded for millions of Americans earlier this year in response to the coronavirus pandemic ran out on Saturday, as President Trump renewed his criticism of a recently passed $900 billion relief package that includes an extension of federal unemployment assistance.

Updated 11 p.m. ET

President Trump issued dozens more pardons on Wednesday evening to many wealthy and well-connected convicts with ties to his innermost circles, including former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, Republican operative Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father-in-law of Ivanka Trump.

In total, Trump pardoned 26 people and commuted the sentences of three more people — the second consecutive night of what is expected to be a flurry of acts of clemency before he leaves office.

Erin Schaff / Getty Images

A judge hearing President Donald Trump's federal lawsuit seeking to overturn Democrat Joe Biden's win in Wisconsin said Friday that the president's request to “remand” the case to the GOP-controlled Legislature to pick new electors was “bizarre.”

On more than one occasion, President Trump has demonstrated his willingness to use his pardon power to pluck a political ally or associate out of legal trouble.

Becca Schimmel

Republicans on Tuesday called for the Democratic chairwoman of the Wisconsin Elections Commission to resign, expressing anger that she finalized the state's presidential election results showing Democrat Joe Biden defeating President Donald Trump.

>>Wisconsin Confirms Joe Biden As Winner Following Recount

Updated at 5:49 p.m. ET

President Trump has pardoned his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who spent years enmeshed in an often bizarre legal war with the government that sprang from the Russia investigation.

Trump announced the news Wednesday on Twitter as Americans prepared to observe the Thanksgiving holiday this week.

Emily Files / WUWM

The recount of the presidential election in Wisconsin’s two most heavily Democratic counties began Friday with President Donald Trump’s campaign seeking to discard tens of thousands of absentee ballots that it alleged should not have been counted.

Becca Schimmel

On Thursday, state elections officials granted the Trump campaign’s request for a partial recount in Wisconsin. It covers only Democratic-leaning Milwaukee and Dane counties.

The official order Thursday kicks off a 13-day clock by which the recount has to be completed.

Aides to President Trump have been counseling him this week that his legal options to try to contest the election are limited, but Trump wants to fight it out, a former campaign adviser who remains in touch with key players told NPR.

"It's dawning on him," the former adviser said, speaking on condition of anonymity to comment on private conversations. "He never thought he could lose ... and those of us who are in Trump World, we actually never believed he could lose."

Scott Olson / Getty Images

A Wisconsin election official is addressing the red pen controversy raised by President Donald Trump's reelection campaign.

Trump may ask for a recount of Tuesday's result in Wisconsin that shows him trailing Democrat Joe Biden by about 20,000 votes.

>>Trump Wants A Recount In Wisconsin. How Would It Work?

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s campaign manager Bill Stepien says the president plans to “immediately” request a recount in the battleground state of Wisconsin, where the race remains close.

In Wisconsin, if a race is within 1 percentage point, the trailing candidate can force a recount.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

President Donald Trump has wrapped up his efforts to win Wisconsin again, as he did in the 2016 election. Trump campaigned in Kenosha Monday night.

The president repeated his disputed claim that his push to send the National Guard to Kenosha in August ended civil unrest that broke out following the police severely wounding a Black man, Jacob Blake. Trump said a vote for him is a vote for safety and values.

"If you want to be treated with dignity and respect, then I am asking you tomorrow to go out and vote for your all-time favorite president," Trump said.

Chuck Quirmbach

Incumbent Donald Trump will make his final Wisconsin visit of the 2020 presidential campaign Monday night at the airport in Kenosha.

The president talks about Kenosha at many events, referring to the civil unrest that occurred in late August after a Kenosha police officer, Rustin Sheskey, severely wounded a Black man, Jacob Blake, as police were responding to what they say was a domestic incident.   

Scott Olson / Getty Images

Donald Trump continues to try to make a late bid to win Wisconsin again, as he did in the presidential election four years ago.

Publicly-released polls conducted in the state show the president trailing Democratic rival Joe Biden by at least 5 percentage points. One poll this week from ABC News and the Washington Post has Trump behind by 17. But during a rally at the Green Bay airport Friday, the president blamed the news media for portraying him doing badly.

POOL / ALEX WONG / GETTY IMAGES

On the presidential campaign trail this summer and fall, it hasn’t all been about COVID-19 or the leadership skills of the two major party candidates, Republican President Donald Trump and Democratic rival Joe Biden.

For example, both candidates have occasionally talked about scientific and technical changes for the nation. One technology advocate says the winner of Tuesday's contest will have a long list of issues to address.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

Updated at 2:22 p.m. CT

Hackers have stolen $2.3 million from the Wisconsin Republican Party's account that was being used to help reelect President Donald Trump in the key battleground state, the party's chairman told The Associated Press on Thursday.

The party noticed the suspicious activity on Oct. 22 and contacted the FBI on Friday, said Republican Party Chairman Andrew Hitt.

POOL / ALEX WONG / Getty Images

Updated at 4:55 p.m. CT

The Marquette Law School Poll released Wednesday shows Joe Biden with a 5-point lead over President Donald Trump among likely voters, 48% to 43%. Since May, Biden has held a 5-point lead over Trump, plus or minus 1 point, in the poll.

The survey was conducted Oct. 21 through Sunday of 749 likely voters. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.4 percentage points.

Chuck Quirmbach

President Donald Trump contends a "great red wave" of Republican voters will help him carry Wisconsin in the Nov. 3 election. Trump spoke Tuesday evening at a rally in West Salem, near La Crosse.

Public opinion polls show Trump trailing Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden in Wisconsin by between 5 and 9 percentage points. But Trump says he has help on the way — if his supporters get out and vote.

"Gotta get out, this is the thing. Just remember, the great red wave,” he told the crowd.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

After two stops in southern Wisconsin over the last two weekends, President Donald Trump takes his reelection campaign to western Wisconsin Tuesday afternoon. He's scheduled to speak in West Salem, near La Crosse.

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse political scientist Anthony Chergosky says the western part of the state remains politically independent and potentially up for grabs. 

Scott Olson / Getty Images

President Trump made a campaign stop in the key battleground state of Wisconsin late Saturday evening, marking his seventh trip to the state this year.

His visit to the conservative stronghold of Waukesha comes as the state continues to see surging COVID-19 cases. But that did not stop thousands from gathering for the outdoor rally. Some wore masks, but there was little to no regard for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended guideline of social distancing.

Susan Bence

Despite the weather, wind and pandemic, thousands of people stood shoulder to shoulder on a flag festooned airport tarmac in Janesville Saturday to rally in support of President Donald Trump.

The Republican described the crowd as stretching as far as the eye could see. Trump came out swinging saying he’s the right choice for the "most important election in the history of our country," not his Democratic opponent Joe Biden.

Chuck Quirmbach

President Donald Trump is scheduled to campaign in Janesville Saturday night. Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers is asking the president to require all those who attend the rally to wear a mask to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

In fact, Evers said Thursday that he wants all politicians who hold events in Wisconsin to require masks.

President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden have very different views on how to tackle America's pressing issues.

That much is clear. But what specifically are they proposing?

NPR Politics has sifted through Trump's and Biden's plans, as released by their campaigns, and narrowed in on a few key issues to show what they're promising and how each man's priorities differ from his opponent's.

Read all of the plans here.

Updated at 8:47 p.m. ET

President Trump plans to deliver remarks on Saturday at an outdoor event, his first public event since being hospitalized for the coronavirus, a White House official confirmed to NPR's Tamara Keith. The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the plans.

The event, first reported by ABC News, is expected to take place on the South Lawn of the White House.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

President Donald Trump's once-comfortable advantage in the pivotal region of Wisconsin around the blue-collar hub of Green Bay has dwindled. In suburban Milwaukee, long a Republican-dominated area, it has thinned as well.

And his supporters are far from confident he can find thousands of new voters in the state's sparsely populated rural areas to make up for the setbacks.

Trump's path to victory in Wisconsin, a state he won narrowly in 2016, has become increasingly complicated, and so has his path to the 270 electoral votes needed for his reelection.

Updated Thursday at 12:48 a.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday boasted of his improved health in a video posted to Twitter, calling his coronavirus diagnosis "a blessing from God."

The president's video address is one of several he has posted to the social media site in the days since he was admitted to and ultimately released from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

Updated at 2:07 p.m. CT

Democratic Presidential Candidate Joe Biden still holds a modest advantage over Republican incumbent Donald Trump among Wisconsinites, according to the latest Marquette Law School Poll.

Biden was supported by 46% of likely voters, compared to 41% for Trump. This latest poll has a margin of error of 4.2%.

Updated at 8:18 p.m. ET

President Trump walked out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday evening, planning on receiving the remainder of his treatment for COVID-19 at the White House.

He was seen pumping his fist in the air on the way out of the building and didn't respond to any questions from the press. Upon arriving back at the White House, Trump walked up the staircase of the South Portico entrance, removed his mask, gave reporters standing below a thumbs-up and saluted Marine One.

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