United Nations

Updated 4:55 p.m. ET

Nikki Haley is resigning as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and will leave the Trump administration at the end of the year, she said Tuesday.

It is not immediately clear what prompted the move. She informed her staff Tuesday, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

Haley appeared with President Trump on Tuesday morning at the Oval Office, where he called her a "fantastic person" and said Haley had told him six months ago that she might take time off at the end of the year.

Fotolia, Ashok B. Mehta

While Americans have been going to the polls to start the complicated business of selecting a president, another leadership change is taking place this year. It’s the change of power in the leadership role at the United Nations. 

That transition will be watched closely by the members of the United Nations Association, a program of the UN Foundation. Chris Whatley is executive director of the US branch of the group, and he was in town recently to speak with members of the Milwaukee chapter and stopped by Lake Effect.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Following last week’s address by Pope Francis, world leaders are gathering at the United Nations this week to go about the process of setting strategic goals for the coming fifteen years. 

The goal-setting comes at a time when world tensions are rising, thanks to ongoing refugee crisis in the Middle East and Europe, and Russia’s recent efforts to exert its influence in eastern Europe. 

Photo by Ashitaka San, Flickr

The eyes of the world remain on Boston in the wake of Monday’s bombings at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The attacks, which killed three, were described by President Obama as an act of terror.

While the incident was not as deadly as the 9/11 attacks, it was a reminder that in a global context, terrorism is a sad and frequent fact of life around the world. It’s one confronted by police forces and government agencies, but also by the United Nations.