WUWM

Angelina Mosher Salazar / WUWM

Updated Friday at 5:39 p.m.:

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett and other city officials held a press conference Friday to express concern over the city’s troubling increase in violence.

“As of this morning, there have been 86 homicides in the city. Last year on this date, there were 43. Exactly a 100% increase in homicides in the city Milwaukee in one year,” said Barrett.

The Associated Press reported five people died in shootings in Milwaukee within 20 hours between Tuesday night and Wednesday evening, including a 16-year-old girl.

Lakshmiprasad/Adobe Stock

  

Health officials say it’s possible we won’t see a vaccine or cure for the coronavirus for awhile. So in the meantime, they’re recommending testing and contact tracing as ways to help control the spread of the infectious disease.

A Wisconsin police officer shot and killed a Black man on Thursday after the man allegedly chased a woman with a pair of knives, though the man's family said police knew he had psychiatric issues and that they don't think he would have been killed if he wasn't Black.

The Sheboygan man's family identified him as 32-year-old Kevan Ruffin, Sheboygan Press Media reported.

Lauren Sigfusson / WUWM

The Milwaukee Common Council's Public Safety and Health Committee is urging the Fire and Police Commission to adopt a number of changes in police procedures and recruitment efforts.

At Thursday’s special meeting, Alderman Khalif Rainey said he wants Milwaukee police to be required to report every time they pull their gun, mace or taser while on duty. Under Rainey’s proposal, officers would also have to report where the incident occurred.

Courtesy of Kyle Charters

In June, some local students were named finalists in the national NPR Student Podcast Challenge.

Aliza Baran

The Fourth of July is fast approaching. And with COVID-19 infections on the rise once again, many people are looking to their backyards as the best option for celebrating the holiday this year. 

People will be bringing the grills out of the garage and firing them up with hopes of making tasty or at the very least edible treats. To help get us started, Milwaukee Magazine’s Ann Christenson shares some of her grilling tips and tricks.

Essay: The First Rehearsal

Jul 2, 2020
eldarnurkovic / stock.adobe.com

Most theaters have been dark for months now due to the coronavirus pandemic. Some are offering their work online. But for people who love the theater, it’s been hard to replace that feeling of seeing a live performance. 

Essayist Marie Kohler recalls her first experience in a theater in her essay “The First Rehearsal.” And she looks hopefully to a time when we all might be able to return.

“Come along and watch a rehearsal tonight while I’m at my theater meeting.”

My mother pushed away from the dining room table and grabbed her purse.

Chuck Quirmbach

Health officials are issuing the standard safety warnings about using fireworks use this week. It may be though that more people should be listening to those warnings as more residents of Wisconsin and the nation, for various reasons, may be setting off their own fireworks.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a lot of community fireworks displays to be canceled, or altered so people don't gather in one area. If people still need a fireworks fix, one place they can go to buy their own is the West Frontage Road along Interstate 94 in Caledonia. 

Emily Files / WUWM

Milwaukee Public Schools is seeking feedback from families and staff about how to reopen in the fall, as the coronavirus pandemic continues.

The survey is available online and closes on July 8. It asks families whether they want their kids to be back in classrooms, stick with virtual learning, or do a combination. And it asks staff whether they feel comfortable returning to schools and what safety measures are important to them.

Emily Files / WUWM

Protests sparked by police killings of Black people are drawing attention to the United States' persistent racial disparities. Those disparities are also widespread in education. Wisconsin has some of the largest test score and high school graduation gaps between Black and white students.

Judge Throws Out Racine's Coronavirus Plan

Jul 1, 2020

A judge on Wednesday threw out Racine’s coronavirus ordinance as unconstitutional.

Racine County Circuit Judge Jon Fredrickson said that Racine’s plan violated Wisconsin’s constitution because it interfered with the right to assemble. The judge also said the ordinance was so broadly written that “no average person of ordinary intelligence can make sense of its sprawling breadth.”

The owner of a CrossFit gym brought the lawsuit, saying the city’s rules threatened his business.

Christian Kaspar-Bartke / Getty Images

The history of policing in America is somewhat unique. As WUWM explored in June, the organizations that operate as our law enforcement were forged before the Civil War, where local patrols were mandated to return stolen property: runaway Black slaves.

But many other countries have radically different approaches to law enforcement that aren’t influenced by the unique racial and economic politics of the United States.

Tap10 / stock.adobe.com

When the state of Wisconsin first announced safer-at-home orders in March, it also ordered a temporary ban on evictions and foreclosures. Unlike the coronavirus pandemic, the order was limited to a 60-day-period that ended in May. Now, as COVID-19 infections are spiking, so too are evictions.

Teran Powell

The Wisconsin Supreme Court won't hear oral arguments in a lawsuit seeking to purge thousands of voters from the rolls until at least September, raising questions about whether the justices will rule before the Nov. 3 presidential election.

HaseHoch2 / stock.adobe.com

  

When people started staying at home due to the coronavirus pandemic, we all looked for things to do for fun to keep us occupied while staying in the house. One major outlet is games.

Pages