WUWM environment

Sunvest Solar, Inc.

A recent report commissioned by the United Nations predicts dramatic consequences if greenhouse gas emissions continue at current rates. So, what can you, as an individual, do about climate change? 

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Susan Bence

The world faces dramatic consequences ranging from heightened food shortages to shrinking coastlines as soon as 2040 if greenhouse gas emissions continue at the current rate, according to scientists from 40 countries convened by the United Nations. 

For years experts believed a rise of 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit was the threshold for severe impacts. But after reviewing more than 6,000 scholarly studies, the scientists concluded human health, economies and ecosystems will suffer with a smaller rise of 2.7 degrees.

Susan Bence

It’s been a decade since the Great Lakes Compact was signed into law. The historic agreement between the U.S. and Canada puts restrictions on large-scale diversions of water.

Susan Bence

Brewers fans have plenty of food options. Eight kitchens produce everything from concession-style faire to pasta with romesco sauce. And, this season a new food cart appeared at the stadium.

ROOTS For the Home Team Milwaukee offers salads served by high school students. And, some of the ingredients come out of gardens the teens tended.

Hunger Task Force

Long before Bevan Baker resigned as public health commissioner in January, the agency said it was taking appropriate steps to educate families how to protect themselves from lead in paint, soil and water. While the city of Milwaukee posted information on its website, placed ads on buses, and mailed leaflets with water bills, some community groups worried word wasn’t getting out to families.

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Lindsay Frost

If you were a fish, you probably wouldn’t choose the harbor — where Milwaukee’s three rivers converge — as a favorite hangout.

After all, its primary function has been commercial since the 1800s. Its edges are lined with steel piling and the bottom is dredged to maintain a depth of 25 feet, allowing safe passage of large vessels conveying cement, salt and such.

Ryszard/flickr

The City of Milwaukee Health Department announced Thursday it has identified the first probable human case of West Nile virus (WNV) of 2018.

WNV is spread to a person through the bite of an infected mosquito. It is not transmitted person to person.

According to the health department, most human cases occur in August and September. The health department advises residents to continue to protect themselves against mosquito bites.

Susan Bence

Update 3:15 P.M.

Bevan Baker did not appear before the Steering & Rules Committee meeting Thursday, but committee chair Ashanti Hamilton said the former health commissioner will participate in a public hearing. Hamilton didn't announce the hearing date. He said council members needed to be briefed by the city attorney.

Susan Bence

People worldwide recently protested climate change in the “Rise for Climate” march. Last Saturday, thousands took to the streets of San Francisco, the site of this week’s Global Climate Action Summit, and hundreds gathered in downtown Milwaukee. 

Azam Niroomand-Rad was among 350-plus people who walked through downtown Milwaukee.

“We are here so people are aware of their environmental problems so that in November they will be able to vote for the candidates who support environmental issues,” she said.

Susan Bence

Milwaukee has hundreds of thousands of trees, many of them in county parks.

Bay View resident Steve Ohly loves them, which is one reason he moved to Milwaukee. “I tend to be a tree hugger, really. But I do it in the morning when nobody’s around,” he says.

So, it’s no surprise that Steve lives across from a sea of trees in the heart of Bay View: Humboldt Park. That’s where I met him, to help answer his Beats Me question.

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Susan Bence

The art exhibit called “Water Works” opens Friday evening at RedLine Milwaukee.

The show's curator, environmental activist and artist Melanie Ariens, chose more than a dozen artists to explore how deeply water affects our lives.

“I tried to find a balance of artists whose work conveyed a spiritual or emotional connection to water and artists who take a more activist approach to addressing water issues,” she said.

Screenshot/City of Milwaukee

Jeanette Kowalik was voted in as the City of Milwaukee's public health commissioner Wednesday. There were no votes of opposition.

In January, news broke that its once–touted childhood lead contamination prevention program was grossly mismanaged. A heartbeat later, health commissioner Bevan Baker resigned.

Based on the candidate’s reception at a special meeting of the Public Safety and Health Committee Tuesday, Kowalik’s prospects appeared bright.

Kowalik told aldermen she feels she was called home to take on the role.

Bigguylittlebikes

The Village of Gays Mills in Crawford County, known for apple orchards and its stunning location on the Kickapoo River, is under water, along with vast stretches up and downstream.

At 7:30 a.m. Thursday, the National Weather Service reported major flooding in Gays Mills, and major flooding remains in the forecast.

Susan Bence

Parts of Wisconsin recently experienced torrential rains. Roads flooded — or in some cases, washed out — in Dane and Iowa counties. Some state trails have closed until further notice. So, where does Milwaukee stand in its ability to cope with massive rain storms?

Harbor District, IInc.

You might know about a small park within Milwaukee's harbor on Jones Island called KaszubeHarbor View Plaza will become the first greenspace since the inception of Harbor District, Inc. Construction is expected to begin this fall.

The public park will be located at the end of Greenfield Avenue. This area just south of the Milwaukee's Third Ward has felt forbidding for years.

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