WUWM News

Senator Scott Fitzgerald, Facebook

Reaction is intensifying to state efforts to intervene in low-performing Milwaukee Public Schools.

It began bubbling to the surface Wednesday, when the leader of the state’s Opportunity Schools and Partnership Program, quit. 

Bonnie Petrie

At the Three Lions Pub in Shorewood, you can get scotch eggs, bangers and mash, and a pint of Guinness, often served with added authenticity by young people who’ve moved here from somewhere in the United Kingdom. WUWM's Bonnie Petrie stopped by the pub to get thoughts on UK's vote to exit the European Union.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

A "media blitz" is underway in San Francisco this week. Dozens of news outlets are reporting on the city’s ongoing struggle with homelessness. Their goal is to encourage people to come up with solutions. No such action is planned in Milwaukee; however, one advocate for the homeless says an effort here could publicize the need for housing and funding.

Marti Mikkelson

    

There’s a new feature at Summerfest on Milwaukee’s lakefront: metal detectors. People attending opening day of the music fest on Wednesday had to pass through them.

Planners say they decided to install the extra security in November, after terror attacks in Paris. Then they announced the move after the recent mass shooting in Orlando, and a few hours before Summerfest opened, terrorists struck Turkey.

Rachel Morello

Mequon-Thiensville Superintendent Demond Means announced Wednesday that he is stepping down from his post as commissioner of the state-mandated MPS turnaround program, indicating the process has become too adversarial.

Wisconsin could receive $13 million to help fight opioid addiction, if Congress approves President Obama's request for $1.1 billion to tackle the issue. Local leaders are urging passage of the plan, with Milwaukee Alderman Michael Murphy reporting that, in the county, nearly 900 people have died of opioid abuse. “That's twice as much as homicides, twice as much as any auto accidents,” Murphy says.

Murphy says people here need help.

Government Accountability Board

Wisconsin’s Government Accountability Board will be replaced June 30 by two partisan panels - one to oversee elections and the other, ethics. As the GAB's end nears, retiring Executive Director Kevin Kennedy offered a mixed view of the state’s Photo ID law. He told Wisconsin Eye that Republican leaders who passed the law know it's making some voters more confident but divorces itself from the reality that some people don’t have a driver’s license or state ID and cannot easily get one.

Pete Marovich/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court has told the State of Wisconsin that justices won't weigh in on Wisconsin's law, requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

Photo courtesy of KidsAndCars.org

This is the first summer during which you will be protected from civil liability should you break a window in someone else’s car to free a child, a vulnerable adult or an animal from the heat.

    

Waukesha leaders continued to celebrate on Wednesday. Earlier this week, all eight Great Lakes states voted to allow the city to draw water from Lake Michigan.

The city sits outside the Great Lakes basin but says it needs the water because Waukesha’s underground supply is running low and is tainted with radium. Waukesha plans to pump-in Lake Michigan water from Oak Creek’s utility because talks with Milwaukee did not advance.

Getty Images News

There’s been a lot of talk lately about guns and gun laws in the U.S.

Last week, a man opened fire, killing 49 people at a nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

This week, Congress decided not to pass several bills that would have reformed the country’s gun laws.

On the same day, a Connecticut judge upheld that state’s ban on assault weapons. Connecticut acted after gunman there killed 20 young children at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012.

Rachel Morello

Thursday marks a big deadline for Milwaukee Public Schools. It’s the day district officials must decide what they think should be done for failing MPS schools.

It’s a decision almost two years in the making. State legislators created the framework for a turnaround program in 2015, and debate has raged over the program’s design, even its mere existence, ever since.

Susan Bence

Tuesday all eight Great Lake states said “yes” to Waukesha's request to draw water from Lake Michigan. It was a historic moment because it was the first test of the Great Lakes Compact, which restricts diversions outside the basin.

The city's underground water supply is dwindling and increasingly contaminated with cancer-causing radium, so Waukesha spent years building its case that the Great Lakes are its only sustainable source for clean drinking water.

LaToya Dennis

Summer has arrived. And for people in Milwaukee who every winter ask themselves why they stay, summer is often reason enough. Beautiful weather, lots of hiking and swimming and camping. Basically, the opportunity to reconnect with nature. There’s a new group in town hoping to forge stronger relationships between black people and the great outdoors.

So there’s this long held stereotype that black people, especially in the north, don’t “do” the outdoors. There’s no interest in hiking, water sports are out and camping, forget about it.

Photos.com

Car thefts have been all over the Milwaukee news lately, and with good reason. Data point to an 11 percent increase last year, and numbers continuing to grow in 2016. The jump is one reason why the city’s Public Safety Committee has scheduled a half-dozen special meetings.

 Members are also concerned about homicides. They are tracking below 2015, but it was a violent year. The Wisconsin Department of Justice was the latest on Monday to testify on why the state’s largest city is seeing a surge in certain crimes.

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