WUWM News

T Nelson

Tia Nelson found herself in the center of  controversy at the close of her tenure as executive secretary of Wisconsin's Board of Commissioners of Public Lands. She resigned from her post last week.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Flickr.com/pinchof

Two Republican state lawmakers want to ban the sale of fetal tissue and create rules for its disposal.

The proposal comes on the heels of a controversial hidden camera video that a California group shot. It shows a conversation between a Planned Parenthood medical director in California and people who are, unbeknownst to her, abortion opponents. They pretend they’re interested in purchasing fetal specimens, and discuss prices.

The video outraged abortion opponents, such as Matt Sande, director of legislation for Pro-Life Wisconsin.

Milwaukee Health Commissioner Bevan Baker says the city needs to address its violent crime as a public health threat.

Michael Ireland, fotolia

When a teenage girl was shot to death this week in Milwaukee, the city’s homicide count hit 86 -- matching the total for all of 2014. Not long afterward, state and Milwaukee officials announced plans to prosecute more gun crimes.

Video Screen Capture

As far as the Milwaukee Police Department knows, the big cat is still at large. 

Alderwoman Milele Coggs released a statement on Wednesday saying, "The case is being handled by Milwaukee police and is still active – the sighting has not been cleared and the information provided by witnesses has not been determined to be unfounded."

If you do spot the animal, call 911 - don't try to capture it or take matters into your own hands.

Jeramey Jannene, flickr

For 75 years, Milwaukee required its employees to live within city limits. The state budget Gov. Scott Walker approved two years ago banned the mandate. An appeals court ruled Tuesday that the city’s rule trumps state law.

In 2013, Walker said he wanted to end the residency requirement because he felt “strongly that people should have the freedom to choose.” Walker referred to the Milwaukee mandate as a wall designed to keep in employees. He insisted it was not key to the city’s success.

Marti Mikkelson

Activities are underway around town to keep students busy and safe during summer vacation. One new program for young men considered at-risk is called Youth Works Milwaukee. 

The teens practice job skills and then head off to work.

DeShawn Ewing is standing at the front of the room at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee, north of downtown. He knows some of the 30 young men seated at tables in front of him may be mourning the loss of a friend or relative.

For 75 years, Milwaukee required its employees to live within city limits. The state budget Gov. Scott Walker approved two years ago banned the mandate. An appeals court ruled Tuesday that the city’s rule trumps state law.

In 2013, Walker said he wanted to end the residency requirement because he felt “strongly that people should have the freedom to choose.” Walker referred to the Milwaukee mandate as a wall designed to keep in employees. He insisted it was not key to the city’s success.

Tia Nelson has resigned from her job with the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands, according to the Wisconsin State Journal. Nelson has served as the agency's executive secretary since 2004. Her father was Earth Day Founder and late Wisconsin U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson.

In April, the board prohibited Nelson and her staff from talking about climate change on the job or working on issues related to climate change. The ban came, after board member and State Treasurer Matt Adamczyk insisted the agency remove all climate change references from its website.

Wisconsin National Guard, flickr

The governor says he wants Wisconsin National Guard members to be able to protect themselves from attack, citing the shootings that killed five servicemen in Chattanooga, Tennessee last week.

Gov. Walker issued an executive order on Tuesday giving the state's Adjutant General Donald Dunbar the authority to arm guard members as necessary and to evaluate longer-term plans to better protect all of Wisconsin's soldiers.

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