WUWM News

Groups in Milwaukee have called for the state or Milwaukee Police Department to release the police video that may have captured the fatal officer shooting of Sylville Smith in August. After completing his investigation last week, Attorney General Brad Schimel said the tape would not be released until the Milwaukee County D-A decides whether to charge the officer.

Communities have made different decisions regarding when to release police footage. For example, Tulsa, Oklahoma released video shortly after an officer killed a black man there this week. Chicago held onto its footage for about a year.

Rachel Morello

The school year was about to begin a few weeks ago, then it abruptly ended for scores of students at ITT Technical Institute. The for-profit college system announced it was closing its campuses nation-wide, including two in Wisconsin, after numerous states accused ITT of fraud.

Democrat Hillary Clinton maintains a small lead over Republican Donald Trump, among likely voters in Wisconsin, according to the latest Marquette Law School Poll. Regarding the U.S. Senate race, the poll shows Democrat Russ Feingold leading Republican incumbent Ron Johnson by six percentage points, among likely voters. Marquette gathers its information by using a combination of landline and cell phone numbers, but other pollsters are experimenting with internet polls.

Marti Mikkelson

People in Milwaukee who need jobs have strong opinions about what the U.S. could do to help everyone in their shoes. The topic is actually the one NPR and its member stations are posing to Americans this week: what can the country – and especially the next slate of elected leaders do, to improve economic opportunities for more Americans? As part of this edition of the series, “A Nation Engaged,” we stopped by the Hire Center on Milwaukee’s north side, and asked people looking for work.

Milwaukee County Sheriff's Office

The community learned more, last week, about the death of a mentally ill inmate in the Milwaukee County Jail.

Terrill Thomas had been in lockup for nine days when he died in his cell on April 24th.

According to the medical examiner’s report, Terrill Thomas died of “profound” dehydration while in solitary confinement.

Fellow inmates say he hadn’t had water for six days and they told jail staff he was sick and needed help.

    

The fall elections are less than two months away, and the Wisconsin race for U.S. Senate appears to be tightening. Incumbent Ron Johnson is trying to secure a second term against Democratic challenger Russ Feingold, in a rematch from 2010.

This time around, each candidate has been trying to link the other to his party’s presidential nominee. The reason – both candidates at the top have low favorability numbers.

Susan Bence

The Common Council is responding to the city’s deteriorating water infrastructure by creating a task force to examine the daunting challenges.

The Water Quality Task Force met for the first time Friday morning.

Its chair, Alderman Jim Bohl, says he doesn’t intend to leave any source of lead contamination unturned. His strategy includes looking at national research.

Michelle Maternowski

Gov. Scott Walker is drawing sharp criticism for his plan to delay highway projects, including the Zoo Interchange in Milwaukee. In the past, the governor has hailed the interchange as key to state businesses that transport products throughout the region.

The death of 38-year-old Milwaukee man who was found unresponsive in his cell at the Milwaukee County Jail in April has been ruled a homicide. The County Medical Examiner's Office says Terrill Thomas died of profound dehydration. The report also noted Thomas was suffering from bipolar disorder.  The Medical Examiner found no evidence of injury.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Update: Three Republican legislators are requesting an investigation into who leaked the secret John Doe documents to The Guardian. Assemblymen Robin Vos, Jim Steineke and John Nygren have sent a letter to Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel, asking him to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate, insisting the person responsible committed a crime.

(Original post follows)

Ann-Elise Henzl

Barbara Miner's ears pricked up last week when Mayor Tom Barrett suggested people living in homes built before 1952 install water filters, especially if small children live there. Miner asked: "Really? Why haven't we heard about this before?"

Miner's Riverwest home is among 70,000 with lead laterals. Those are the pipes that connect houses to the city's water mains. As the laterals age, lead can break off and mix with drinking water.

We all hold our fair share of stress – work, family matters, keeping a social calendar.

For high school students, that list also includes homework, thinking about college and a host of other “teenage” worries.

One all-girls high school in Milwaukee is trying to give its students the tools to manage stress – and take responsibility for their own well-being.

This isn’t your average gym class. In fact, it’s not gym class at all.

Michelle Maternowski

The Milwaukee County Parks, Energy and Environment Committee meeting Tuesday was the latest scene of public debate over Pokémon's popularity in Lake Park.

Supervisor Sheldon Wasserman says he’s hearing from his constituents loud and clear. The smartphone game Pokémon Go has turned life as usual in the Lake Park neighborhood upside down.

Wasserman blames Niantic, the company that created the virtual reality game for the crowds of people congregating in and around the park.

Marti Mikkelson

After unrest rocked Milwaukee in August - following the police killing of a black man, Gov. Walker promised to send mobile job banks to distressed city neighborhoods. Many are plagued by joblessness and crime.

On Tuesday, the first traveling unit arrived. It set up a bank of computers on 27th and North, inside the Dept. of Workforce Development. Several dozen people came in to take advantage of the services.

Jerry Grover sat in a corner of the Hire Center, searching for jobs on a laptop.

Susan Bence

Harris Lowell Byers grew up in Georgia loving science and agriculture. Today, he lives in Glendale, remediates brownfields, and is the father of two children. Byers says the scientist and dad in him wanted to find out how much lead might be making its way from the urban soils into vegetables; so he headed back to school to earn a PhD at UW-Milwaukee's geosciences department to try to come up with answers.

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