Michelle Maternowski

Local roads across Wisconsin are in need of repair. Democratic state Sen. Jennifer Shilling recently called on GOP lawmakers to help fix the problem.

A prominent Democratic lawmaker wants to shake up the Milwaukee County Executive’s office.

State Sen. Chris Larson of Milwaukee announced Monday that he will challenge incumbent Chris Abele in April.

The election promises to be competitive.

Larson announced his bid outside his childhood home in Greenfield. Flanked by his parents, wife and two small children, Larson said he’s been mulling his decision for months.

Justin W Kern

The GOP continues to exercise total control over Wisconsin government. And, Republican leaders are using their majority to advance party priorities.

Just late last week, Gov. Walker appointed conservative Appeals Judge Rebecca Bradley to the state Supreme Court. She’ll finish the term of the late Justice Patrick Crooks, who was viewed as the court’s lone swing vote.

mzn37, flickr

Republican legislative leaders on Wednesday introduced a bill that would dramatically rebuild the Government Accountability Board.  

The current panel is comprised of nonpartisan judges who oversee state elections and administer ethics laws.

The new board would be split into two commissions.  One would handle elections, the other ethics.  Commissioners would be partisan positions appointed by the governor and both parties in the legislature.

Gov. Scott Walker will soon appoint a judge to serve out the remainder of Justice Patrick Crook’s term on the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Crooks died unexpectedly last month, just days after announcing he would not seek re-election in 2016. His death leaves Gov. Walker with the decision of whether to appoint one of the candidates to the court.

While it doesn’t happen often in Wisconsin, a governor appointing a state Supreme Court Justice isn’t unheard of. For instance, Marquette Law Professor Janine Geske was first seated on the court by former Gov. Tommy Thompson.

S Bence

Some educators in northern Wisconsin aren't letting the fact that climate change is a politically charged issue sway them from teaching about the subject.

Cathy Techtmann is among them. The UW-Extension environmental outreach specialist decided it was time to rethink climate change education.

“The old model purely based on science were just not resonating with people,” Techtmann says. “A lot of people realize that there’s cultural component, not just a scientific piece but also a cultural piece that makes the issue come alive to people.”

Ann-Elise Henzl

Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele gave his budget address Wednesday. He picked both a location and an audience for the speech that have not been the norm.

Every Milwaukee County executive must propose next year's budget by October 1. So for years, execs delivered the budget at the county board's September meeting, in the courthouse.

But Wednesday, Chris Abele outlined his plan for 2016 at the Pritzlaff Building downtown.

Andy Manis/Getty Images

Gov. Walker's approval rating has dropped since August, according to the latest Marquette Law School Poll, released Wednesday. Among the voters surveyed, 37% approve of the job Walker is doing as governor, while 59% disapprove.

Waukesha Mayor Shawn Reilly wonders if he or other elected leaders can persuade General Electric to change its mind about moving a century-old engine manufacturing plant and its 350 jobs to Canada.

The company says it will leave Waukesha because Congress has not re-authorized the U.S. Export-Import Bank. It helped companies sell products overseas. Conservative Republicans in the House let the bank's charter expire in July because they view the loans it makes as corporate welfare. Canada still has such an agency.

Marti Mikkelson

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett wants to equip police officers with body cameras by the end of next year. 

Police say the devices provide the most accurate account of interactions between officers and suspects.

It's expected to cost nearly $1 million to purchase 1,200 cameras.

Nearly 100 people turned out at the Hillside Family Resource Tuesday night for a public hearing. Speakers voiced a myriad of concerns.