WUWM News

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Violent crime is up across the country, including in Milwaukee, according to US Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He held a press conference in Milwaukee Tuesday at the federal courthouse to address crime trends, and promised new measures, he said, will reduce crime rates.

Sessions said violent crime had been down for a couple of decades, but has gone up in the last two years, and he said it’s not a light matter.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

A bill floating through the Legislature would eliminate protection of some wetlands in Wisconsin. Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steinecke, who authored the bill, says the measure would free developers from unnecessary regulations, when parcels have no environmental value.

Others are concerned Wisconsin stands to lose natural pockets of marshy earth that soak up storm water as well as provide habitat.

Al Drago/Getty Images

Speculation about Paul Ryan's future is swirling in Washington, DC. That's because a couple of news outlets are reporting that they've learned that the longtime Wisconsin GOP lawmaker plans to resign -- or not run for reelection next fall.

LaToya Dennis

The Milwaukee Office of Violence Prevention held its final informational meeting on Wednesday, on a plan to reduce violence across the city. Around 50 people showed up to find out more about what’s being proposed and how they can help.

Marti Mikkelson

Many African-American men in Milwaukee face a number of challenges, including unemployment, poverty and mass incarceration. But, a two-day summit that’s underway is helping black teens and boys overcome some of those barriers. Several young people we spoke with talked about the hurdles they face.

Rachel Morello

With change comes uncertainty -- and uncertain is exactly the vibe on UW-Milwaukee’s campus, as faculty, staff and students begin to learn more about the future of their school.

Wisconsin’s public university system will look different in 2018. Come next fall, UWM will merge with a couple two-year UW campuses.

MCTS

Milwaukee lawmakers are getting creative when it comes to trying to ensure city residents are not left out of the expected job boom that will be created by Foxconn. One alderman is now floating the idea of expanding the footprint of the city.

Annexation, the act of incorporating new territory into the domain of a city, country or state, is not a term thrown around a lot these days. At a Milwaukee common council committee meeting on Tuesday, it got some play.

LaToya Dennis

Some Milwaukee residents are up in arms because of two incidents last week involving contract workers for the city.

Two of the workers lost their jobs. But there’s still a call for the city to reduce the number of contract workers it uses, who don’t live in Milwaukee.

So here are two things you don’t typically hear talked about in the same sentence—guns and stickers. But in Milwaukee last week, a KKK sticker on a worker’s lunch cooler caused outrage among some residents.

Althouse

Sexual harassment claims became public last week, regarding Democratic state Rep. Josh Zepnick.  Two women allege Zepnick kissed them against their will.  In this week's Capitol Notes conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com whether he expects to learn about more harassment complaints in Madison.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

One point twenty-seven million tons. That’s how much garbage was added to Orchard Ridge last year alone. The landfill is located in the Village of Menomonee Falls. Of the 85 licensed operations in Wisconsin, Orchard Ridge is the largest.

On an average day 400 to 600 trucks haul in garbage from four counties – Ozaukee, Washington, Waukesha and Milwaukee.

But, how much more waste can the 23-year-old landfill hold? And what will become of the site once it is full?

Tracy Symonds-Keogh

A federal appeals court on Friday overturned a ruling that could have freed a Wisconsin inmate featured in the Netflix series "Making a Murderer."  The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decided that police properly obtained Brendan Dassey's confession, and he should remain in prison. 

The judges were sharply divided, voting 4-3 that authorities did not cajole Dassey into admitting his crimes.  Dassey was sentenced to life in prison in 2007, after he told detectives that he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill photographer Teresa Halbach. 

Leaders in the state Assembly -- from both parties -- stated last week that they won't release records related to claims of sexual harassment within the chamber, in order to protect victims' privacy.  WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com how the decision might sit with constituents.

Ross also talks about the likelihood of the state Legislature approving Gov. Walker's request for $7 million to launch a massive ad campaign to attract Foxconn workers -- and we discuss whether the governor will appoint a conservative candidate for Milwaukee County Sheriff.

Susan Bence

Before the City of Milwaukee was the Milwaukee we know, it was a massive marsh and wetland system fed by the Milwaukee, Menomonee and Kinnickinnic Rivers. By the 1850s, the wetlands were filled in and replaced by factories and foundries. By some miracle, one small bit of wetland – now called the Grand Trunk - survived along the harbor’s south central edge.

Despite the channelized Kinnickinnic River just to the wetland's west, endangered garter snakes and other native critters are still found in the 6.5 degraded acres.

Jesse Lee/Marquette University

There have been more than 300 drug-related deaths in Milwaukee County this year.

Dozens of people concerned about the opioid crisis gathered for a discussion about solutions at Marquette University.

Experts at the event say there are many factors that contribute to the growing epidemic. They say the problem isn’t going to go away, but there are tools being used to make significant progress.

Several dozen people shared their ideas Thursday night, on how to build better relations between Milwaukee police and the community. The group, African American Roundtable held a town hall meeting on the north side. We stopped by the gathering and asked people about their concerns.

Sheila Hills lives in Milwaukee’s Metcalfe Park neighborhood. She says the area is struggling, and there are issues that contribute to crime.

“I see a lot of unemployment there and that idles people. It stagnates the neighborhood and I see a lot of boarded up houses.”

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