WUWM News

WUWM now continues its Project Milwaukee series, exploring the barriers that hold back some Milwaukee Public School students from achieving at a higher level.

Today we look at the role parents play in their children’s success.

WUWM’s Susan Bence met people who care passionately and have strong opinions about the importance of family in a child’s life.

Poverty and Violence Impact MPS Students

Jun 1, 2010

There’s been no shortage of stories about dismal test scores in the Milwaukee Public Schools system. We’ve heard less about how it performs in helping students and families address personal and social problems. No other district in the state uses as many resources as MPS to address the non-academic needs of its students. Those needs are the subject of today’s installment of our series, Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS.

How MPS Compares with Peers

May 28, 2010

According to a Milwaukee Public Schools summary, the district's students in all grades, collectively, are performing below state standards in reading and math.

In this installment of Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Success in MPS, WUWM’s Marge Pitrof explores where the city stands among its contemporaries.

Grads Give MPS Mixed Grades

May 28, 2010

We tip off our Project Milwaukee series focusing on issues that prevent some Milwaukee Public Schools students from succeeding, by asking WUWM News Intern Andy Ambrosius to gather recollections of former MPS students. He headed to the downtown Milwaukee MATC campus where he found several graduates who’ve moved on to the next phase of their lives. Their memories of MPS are mixed.

Graduation is just around the corner for many high school students. But in the Milwaukee Public Schools system, a startling number of children drop out before they reach twelfth grade. Many who stay in school perform below national standards. On Friday, WUWM's news reporters and Lake Effect producers will begin a series, which explores challenges in the urban education system. Ann-Elise Henzl is executive producer of Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS. She joined Bob Bach in the studio for an overview of the series.

Erin Toner

In 2009, milk prices dropped so low that dairy farmers lost up to half their income. Some had to slaughter their cows because they couldn’t afford to feed them anymore. Others decided enough was enough, and sold their animals and their land.WUWM’s Erin Toner visits a family near Slinger who made it through last year, but just barely.

Erin Toner

2009 was a make or break year for dairy farmers in Wisconsin. Milk prices dropped so low that most farmers had to go deeper into debt just to survive. Some lost so much money they had to sell their farms. Today, we begin a series profiling two dairy farming families in Wisconsin. Both managed to weather the worst year they can remember, and hope to stay in the business they love as long as they can.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A unique group of gospel singers is making music in Milwaukee, at churches and other venues. What makes the choir unusual is the combination of people in it. Some are homeless. Ann-Elise Henzl attended one of the group's rehearsals, and learned that it’s hoping to take a trip abroad this summer.

Water Efforts Criticized as Misguided

Dec 11, 2009

All week, we’ve been reporting on local efforts to position Milwaukee as the world’s hub for water technology and research. We visited companies already here, and reported on incentives to grow the industry, such as tax breaks. But there’s been limited criticism. Today, we delve into a report that calls the initiative financially risky and unlikely to succeed. WUWM’s Erin Toner has today’s installment of Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

If you have an idea for conserving or cleaning water -- or even using it -- Milwaukee could one day be the place to develop your invention.

That's the dream. A coalition of community leaders is pushing the city to become a global hub for water research and technology.

But is it really possible for a region to make itself the headquarters of an industry? And is there competition? We seek answers to those questions, in today's installment of Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl reports.

Our series Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water continues this morning. We’re reporting on Milwaukee’s efforts to become a global hub for water research and technology. In the past few years, companies already in the water business here have been expanding. But as WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, leaders are now working to kick the effort into high gear. The ultimate prize would be jobs and economic development, along with a good dose of prestige.

Not too long ago, Milwaukee was thought of as a beer town. After all, the city was home to four large breweries, and they used plenty of water. So did other industries that took root here, such as tanneries. Milwaukee was perfect, sitting in around one-fifth of the world’s fresh water supply. All the related companies that developed are now prompting Milwaukee to forge ahead with a plan to become a global water hub. In this installment of our Project Milwaukee series, The Currency of Water, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis introduces us to some of the players. It’s a little after four on a weekday afternoon and second shifters at Badger Meter are busy.

Today, WUWM begins a week-long series called “Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.”

We will explore southeastern Wisconsin’s prospects of becoming an international hub for water technology.

WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence starts with a look at the history of water use in Milwaukee and what’s contributing to the water hub dream.

Dairy farming has been a part of Wisconsin’s landscape for generations. A small fraction of those operations is organic. WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence visited a couple committed to organic farming and to passing on their methods to the next generation.

This is the sound of 140 happy cows grazing a few miles outside Elkhorn, Wisconsin.

A few months ago WUWM News met three Milwaukee entrepreneurs who set their sights high. They hope to create a commercial aquaculture business in an old factory building in Bay View. The idea is to raise, and then sell, thousands of fish, using a natural filtering system that grows edible plants along the way. WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence visited Sweet Water Organics to see how the business is coming along.

This is a space transformed.

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