Project Milwaukee: What's On Our Plate?

The Impact of Wisconsin's Food Economy

Wisconsin is one of the nation's biggest producers of cheese, milk, butter, sweet corn, oats and carrots. The state is known globally for its cranberries and ginseng. Agriculture and related industries provide more than 300,000 jobs, or about 10% of the state's total employment, according to the Wisconsin Farm Bureau.

While some sectors of the economy have been shrinking, there appears to be opportunity for growth in Wisconsin's food-related industries. Numerous jobs in Wisconsin are connected to foods grown, produced and packaged in the state, and shipped around the world.

During November of 2010, the Project Milwaukee: What's On Our Plate? series focused on the foods made in Wisconsin, and the impact of the state's food-related economy.

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Project Milwaukee
11:06 am
Fri November 19, 2010

Opportunities for Urban Agriculture

In our Project Milwaukee conclusion Friday Nov. 19 WUWM’s Bob Bach interviewed a number of guests, including James Godsil of Sweet Water Organics. It is exploring innovations in urban farming, including growing thousands of fish in a former industrial building.

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Project Milwaukee
11:04 am
Fri November 19, 2010

Why Good Businesses Choose to Locate and Grow Here

Chris Dresselhuys of Palermo's Pizza
Credit Joshua Sutton

In this Project Milwaukee segment, WUWM’s Bob Bach interviewed Chris Dresselhuys, Director of Marketing for Palermo’s Pizza in Milwaukee. The company has a 135,000 square foot manufacturing facility in the city's Menomonee Valley. Palermo's Pizza has its roots in a family bakery and restaurant that Italian immigrants, Jack and Zina Fallucca, opened in Milwaukee in the 1960s.

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Project Milwaukee
11:00 am
Fri November 19, 2010

Local Food Movement Growing Here

Dave Swanson (right) and Dan in south side warehouse that transfers Wisconsin produce to Milwaukee restaurants.

All week, WUWM has been exploring the strength of Wisconsin’s food industry, including its economic impact here in the southeast.

The state’s lion’s share is its commodities such as grains and dairy products, as well as processed foods. They’re sold across the country, and Wisconsin continues to develop markets overseas, because that’s where 96 percent of the world’s eaters live.

But the state is also begun promoting the local food movement; it encourages residents to buy foods produced close to home. The goal is to put fresher, more nutritious items on tables, while generating more business for Wisconsin producers.

Here’s more from WUWM's Marge Pitrof, on this, our our final day of Project Milwaukee: What’s on Our Plate?

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Project Milwaukee
10:48 am
Fri November 19, 2010

Building Innovative Food Systems

Jesse Hull, Sweet Water Organics horticulturalist

There’s a national movement afoot to grow more food in cities.

And the Milwaukee area stands out as an urban agricultural hotbed, as raised gardens multiply in backyards, empty lots and community spaces. Another promising piece of urban food production is called “aquaponics”.

They’re systems that combine fish and produce.

On this final day of our Project Milwaukee series on the local food economy, Environmental Reporter Susan Bence introduces us to local innovators using this fishy model to inspire future leaders.

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Project Milwaukee
10:39 am
Fri November 19, 2010

Live Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? Part One

Lake Effect's Mitch Teich
Joshua Sutton

We conclude our Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? series with a live panel discussion from the ground floor of the Chase Tower on the future of Wisconsin's food economy. We start our conversation by looking at whether the food industry is recession-proof.

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