Project Milwaukee

Springing from conversations with concerned community members, WUWM journalists developed Project Milwaukee -- in-depth reporting on vital issues in the region. Each Project Milwaukee consists of WUWM News reporters and Lake Effect producers teaming up to create a series of interviews and reports on a specific topic culminating in a public forum or live broadcast.

WUWM tackles subjects of importance to southeastern Wisconsin by focusing on issues that warrant extensive coverage. The topics chosen are based on concerns we've heard from residents and community leaders.

WUWM hopes that our coverage helps to further the understanding of broad, significant subjects, and encourages additional debate in the community.

WUWM's Project Milwaukee. Our region. Our future.

What topic should WUWM explore next?

------------------------------------------------------------------------

PROJECT MILWAUKEE SERIES ARCHIVE

Innovation - How Do We Compete? - February 2016

Black Men in Prison - November 2013
Why are so many Wisconsinites behind bars? And, what are the costs?

Power Switch - June 2013
The Promise and Reality of Green Energy in Wisconsin

Help Wanted - October 2012
Uncovering the Truth Behind Wisconsin's Skills Gap

State of Upheaval - December 2011

Southern Connections - June 2011
Cultivating a Regional Corridor

What's On Our Plate? - November 2010
The Impact of Wisconsin's Food Economy

Barriers to Achievement in MPS - June 2010

The Currency of Water - December 2009

Black & White - June 2009
Race Relations in Milwaukee

Wise Today, Well Tomorrow? - November 2008

Youth Violence - June 2008

Creating a Vibrant Regional Economy - November 2007

Center for Driver's License Recovery and Employability

One issue that’s come up repeatedly in our Project Milwaukee interviews on the imprisonment of African American males is driving privileges.

Automobile Association image

Many of Milwaukee's poorest residents are dealing with a double-whammy when it comes to access to employment: poverty and suspended driving privileges.

Wisconsin incarcerates black men at staggering rates. WUWM's Susan Bence talks with eight men living the statistics. They are currently serving time at the Milwaukee County House of Correction in Franklin.

Photos.com

Analysts and advocates say a wide variety of social and cultural factors contribute to the high rate of African American male incarceration in Wisconsin.

photos.com

A study released in spring shows the number of black men imprisoned in Wisconsin began to climb around 1990 and peaked in 2007.

Photos.com

Though Wisconsin has the unfortunate distinction of having the country's highest rate of black male incarceration, it does fall in line with national trends.

Scores of adults reach out every day to help young people in some of Milwaukee's poorest neighborhoods.

Photos.com

Larry Jackson's first run-in with the law was a stint in a juvenile facility at nine-years-old.  Since then, the Milwaukee man's been in and out of prison, spending about 20 years total behind bars.

Photos.com

The news that Wisconsin has the highest rate in the country of incarceration among African-American men continues to reverberate and many are asking why.

In 2010, one in eight working-age black men in Wisconsin was in prison. WUWM News meets one of them.

Pages